Day 2. The vibe of San Francisco

Still “jet laggy“, after getting to bed at 1AM we’re up at 6AM getting ready to explore San Francisco.

Metro takes us to the coast where we start our walking in the San Francisco Piers. It’s cloudy and windy, so warmer jacket is always needed.

We visit the Fisherman’s Wharf, where we get to see small shops, restaurants, street performance and tens of sea lions hanging there.

No fish were catched by me that day :)
Fisherman's Wharf
Sea lions at the Fisherman’s Wharf
Shore

We make a choice to have lunch outside. Even though it’s windy and you need to hold the food that it wouldn’t come off the table, the great atmosphere and the view of Golden Gate Bridge makes us stay there.

Lunch at the Crissy Field

On our way back to downtown we visit the Palace of Fine Arts, which was designed in 1915 by an American inspires by Greek and Roman architecture. Great place to rest and take some fine photos.

Palace of Fine Arts

We managed to understand why the obesity level in San Francisco is quite low compared to the average. Well at least it was our guess… Hills! They are everywhere. The streets are so steep at some places, that you need to put a lot of effort to conquer them.

San Francisco hills
Lombard Street
One of the steepest streets of San Francisco

In the end of the day we managed to get into the local Lithuanian community organized meeting, where we had some beers and warm chatter with the local Lithuanians.

Our wonderful Lithuanian host took us to places with some of the greatest views of San Francisco. Breathtaking experience to see millions of the city lights from above. While the San Francisco view from the Treasure Island makes you think that it’s Manhattan, NYC; view from Twin Peaks is very similar to Signal Hill in Cape Town, SAR.

San Francisco view from the Twin Peaks
San Francisco view from the Treasure Island

After a quite active day we’re preparing for tomorrow, when we plan to continue our trip in SF and visit Alcatraz island.

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