How to plan parking for the future of mobility

Background

The adoption of cars during the 20th Century dramatically improved standard of living while driving massive social changes and more subtle requirements in urban planning. Over time city planners developed precise zoning requirements from the Institute of Transportation Engineers’ (ITE) Parking Generation Manual, which have been shown to be arbitrary and not data-driven. Even in low-income housing projects where many residents don’t own cars, zoning codes require vast lots to house these non-existing vehicles. These regulations were well-intentioned but often resulted in bizarre outcomes.

Form follows parking: parking regulations enforce an arbitrary abundance of spots. Many downtowns devote 50 to 60% of their real estate to vehicles: with typically 30% of the surface for roads and 20% for off-street parking. …


Policies that reduce further emissions and remediate land provide cost-effective, long-term solutions.

Ever since spending my summers living in the countryside of 峭崎鎮 (a village in the Jiangsu province) teaching English, I’ve been extremely interested in rural pollution in China. I’ve written for many years on the issue and wanted to use principles from system dynamics to model the spread of pollution in order to simulate the impact of various pollution tax policies on the land.

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Project Overview

CONTEXT

Through tax benefits and lax environmental standards, local governments incentivize the building of factories to grow their economy. The resulting factory pollution contaminates land via wastewater. Polluted land becomes infertile and uninhabitable, killing residents and the local farming industry. As current research suggests that more than 70% of China’s soil could have problems, China nears the “red line” of 120 million arable hectares needed to sustain the population. Therefore, rural pollution poses a threat to the long-term viability of the country. …


I was convinced the Wifi dropped off around my workspace—here’s how I built deadspottr, a robot to find those deadspots.

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deadspottr

BUILD PROCESS

Deadspottr was built on the TurtleBot 3 Platform with custom Robotic Open Source (ROS) nodes allowing for constant signal monitoring.

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Package Layout

Building the platform was very straight-forward and went quickly.

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Build Process

INSTALLATION

However, when it came time to bootload onto the OpenCR1.0 and to install the Ubuntu software onto the Raspberry Pi, some deconstruction had to be done to fully access all of the necessary ports.

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Software Installation

After installing the necessary ROS Kinetic libraries, in your catkin workspace use the terminal to create a new package. The dependencies for this package are std_msgs for wifi-signal strength that will be published, and rospy for running python in the node. …


I put one together, and so can you.

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Front Panel

BUILD PROCESS

In this project, we created a digital Etch-a-Sketch with a VGA output. In order to build it, we needed:

Part List
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Package Map

We wired knobs into our FPGA board and coded the board to handle knob, switch, and push-button inputs, and to output our sketches to the VGA. Here’s how all the components are connected:

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On-Board Connections

About

Taggart Bonham

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