For the 200th time, “You Reap What You Sow.”

Sometimes I forget certain things like,

“We’re all in this together”

“Life is about being happy”

“Don’t have coffee past 8pm”

“Donuts are not a good midnight snack”

And I forget them in the busiest times of my life, those most stressful times when remembering them would be really good for me emotionally, mentally and physically. But it never ceases that just as your about to break in the lovely haywire of it all (the stuff you signed up for), that’s the moment someone random, an acquaintance or a stranger, or the client of a client, or the sister of a friend of a friend says something that makes you check yourself.

“It’s not a race.”

And you’ve heard that a million times before. You don’t even really believe them. But then they say it differently. They say with absolute confidence,

“Day at a time.”

And you think, Ok. Doable. We all know the saying, “what you sow today, you reap tomorrow” and the way I originally approached that statement was not the greatest. I began to think of it as a Daily trade off. My seeds were very particular: No latte today means more savings tomorrow. But that saying is not saying that at all. It has nothing to do with trade offs. Somewhere along the line, reap what you sow turned into a zero sum game for me, approached with a binary mindset of this or that, can and can’t do, what I rather have vs what I could wait on. My mindset was subconsciously on scarcity — weird, as I pride myself on abundance and positive psychology — but there it was: a scarcity, fear-based, deeply rooted mindset. And honestly, in America in particular, it’s very hard to believe that we’re allowed to have that.

Rather than the completely made up binary approach to reap what you sow, I needed to see it as linear. For an over-thinker, understanding the world is typically in scatterplot fashion, but this was a straight line — as straight a line as you can get in nature. It’s about planting. Continuously planting. And then planting more.


It’s amazing the metaphor of flowers. The cyclical seasons of their bloom. The other day I watched a bee on a rose for a few minutes in my backyard and I thought about the way that rose blooms if you’re not busy enough to actually pay attention to it. And I thought, I work in cycles like that.

Curiosity plants a little seed in me or I purposefully plant one myself, nurture it with learning, seemingly not doing anything for awhile, external factors leave their influence, making me better — sometimes keeping me alive, and then the pre-blossom, and then the absolute bloom. Spectacular.


It’s different when you have the real realization that what you do today creates your tomorrow, when it hits you a certain way that only the proper time and place and circumstance and stranger can hit you. It gets to be kind of empowering, scary, even pressuring. It’s awkwardly wonderful, though, to be the creator of your world, isn’t it?


If you like what you read, please share it by hitting the Recommend button. These ideas are semi-influenced by a book I’m writing on the ideas of Alan Watts, in which I would happily love your unofficial support.

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