Sadie Fienberg: Medium for Change

A representative seat on the Associated Students of the University of Nevada senate is a heavy task to fulfill, especially when acting alone. However, Sadie Fienberg acts as the single representative for the Reynolds School of Journalism, bursting with energy as she describes her position.

With her open personality and warm sense of humor, Fienberg is laid-back and relatable, while carrying herself with a sense of professionalism that earns the trust and confidence of those who meet her. “[My constituents] can come talk to me if it affects the university and I can bring it back to the (ASUN) senate and make those changes,” she promises.

Her goals include extending the hours at the Reynolds school to give students the option to further utilize its resources, raising awareness about RSJ clubs, increasing recruitment for the college, and reinstating “Journalism Week.” However, her initial status as a student provides her a unique perspective on the school’s needs, such as a coffee cart for journalism students to get their caffeine fix.

She takes her position very seriously, making it her priority to not only acknowledge the college’s needs, but to make sure they are carried out. She values the relationships between herself, the students, and the staff of the Reynolds school, emphasizing her “duty as a school representative and as a good Samaritan in general to do what they ask.”

She states, “On a personal standpoint, if someone asks me to do something, I’m gonna do it because I know if I asked someone else to do something, I would hope they would show me the same respect.”

Her dedication stems from her passion for the journalism program. Fienberg strives to inspire the change and growth that she has been able to witness in her time as a student. She associates strong friendships and memories with the Reynolds school, her passion evident in her smile as she praises the program. “We’re reputable and we’re out there. We make professional students producing great quality work.”

What better representative could one ask for, than someone who holds the Reynolds school on a pedestal and has such respect for its constituents? Fienberg strives to “show my passion to everybody else and make a difference in the program that’s already given me so much.” And she has. Her enthusiasm is contagious; it draws you in, forces your attention, until you can’t help but love the Reynolds school as she does.

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