If you are at or north of the green line on this forecast map, you may be able to see the aurora — northern lights — on the horizon or overhead (within the solid band on the map) on Aug. 18, 2022. Auroral activity will be high(++). Weather permitting, highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit, to Portland OR, Cheyenne, Lincoln, Springfield, and , and visible low on the horizon as far south as Carson City, Oklahoma City, and Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

Look for Northern Lights on August 17, 18 and 19, Weather Permitting

Tonight, tomorrow night and early Friday may be good times to go outside and look at the horizon and overhead.

That’s because you may be able to see the aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights, weather permitting and depending on your location.

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center has issued minor-strong geomagnetic storm watches for Aug. 17 to 19.

The aurora — a luminous glow — is seen around the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. The light stems from collisions between electrically charged particles streaming out from the sun in the solar wind, according to the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The particles enter Earth’s atmosphere and collide with molecules and atoms of gas, mainly oxygen and nitrogen.

Weather permitting, highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead on Aug. 17 from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit to Juneau, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay and Sept-Iles, according to the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Such displays will be visible low on the horizon from Seattle, Des Moines, Chicago, Cleveland, Boston and Halifax, Novia Scotia.

On Aug. 18 (weather permitting), highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit, to Portland (Oregon), Cheyenne, Lincoln, Springfield, and New York City, the institute says. Such displays will be visible low on the horizon as far south as Carson City, Oklahoma City and Raleigh, North Carolina.

On Aug. 19 (weather permitting), highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit to Vancouver, Helena, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Bay City, Toronto, Montpelier, and Charlottetown, the institute says. Such displays will be visible low on the horizon from Salem, Boise, Cheyenne, Lincoln, Indianapolis and Annapolis, Maryland.

Northern Lights May be Visible Tonight in New Hampshire, Maine and other Northern States

It may be impossible to see northern lights in parts of New England much of this week, however, as a result of an “anomalous late summer Nor’easter.”

In Alexandria, New Hampshire, for example, the National Weather Service forecast calls for rain likely tonight then cloudy weather and partly cloudy skies tomorrow night.

Northern Lights May be Visible in Northern States on March 31

More images:

A G3 storm could drive the aurora farther away from its normal polar residence, and if other factors come together, the aurora might be seen over portions of Pennsylvania, Iowa to northern Oregon. Source: NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center
If you are at or north of the green line on this forecast map, you may be able to see the aurora — northern lights — on the horizon or overhead (within the solid band on the map) on Aug. 17, 2022. Weather permitting, highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit to Juneau, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay and Sept-Iles, and visible low on the horizon from Seattle, Des Moines, Chicago, Cleveland, Boston, and Halifax. Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Daily forecast of geomagnetic activity in 3-hour intervals. The current time interval (about 9:35 a.m. EDT on Aug. 17, 2022, is highlighted in blue. Subtract four hours from UTC (Universal Time) to get Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Forecast of geomagnetic activity in 3-hour intervals on Aug. 18, 2022. Subtract four hours from UTC (Universal Time) to get Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
If you are at or north of the green line on this forecast map, you may be able to see the aurora — northern lights — on the horizon or overhead (within the solid band on the map) on Aug. 19, 2022. Weather permitting, highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Iqaluit to Vancouver, Helena, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Bay City, Toronto, Montpelier, and Charlottetown, and visible low on the horizon from Salem, Boise, Cheyenne, Lincoln, Indianapolis and Annapolis. Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Forecast of geomagnetic activity in 3-hour intervals on Aug. 19, 2022. Subtract four hours from UTC (Universal Time) to get Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
If you are at or north of the green line on this forecast map, you may be able to see the aurora — northern lights — either on the horizon or overhead (within the solid band on the map) on Sept. 3 and 4, 2022. Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
If you are at or north of the green line on this forecast map, you may be able to see the aurora — northern lights — either on the horizon or overhead (within the solid band on the map) on Sept. 5, 2022. Source: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
An astronaut on the International Space Station took this photo of the aurora on September 29, 2011. Source: NASA
An astronaut on the International Space Station took this photo of the aurora on March 16, 2020, as it passed just south of the Alaskan Peninsula. The rising sun added a deep blue to the horizon. Light from cities in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada, joined starlight to dot the early morning skyscape. Source: NASA

You can subscribe to my NH EnviroGuy blog via email: https://medium.com/subscribe/@tbbates16

Photos at Serene, Colorful Lees Pond in Moultonborough, New Hampshire

Cool Clouds, Sunset at Newfound Lake in New Hampshire After Storm

Hurricanes and Tropical Storms in New England, With the Chances of Them Coming Within 50 Miles

Nor’easter Winds Gust to 94 mph in Massachusetts, Higher than Superstorm Sandy in New Jersey

1821 Hurricane Slammed U.S. East Coast

--

--

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Todd B. Bates/NH EnviroGuy

NH EnviroGuy blogger & photography enthusiast living near Newfound Lake in New Hampshire & in Marin County, CA. Finalist, 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service.