Image for post
Image for post

There is an annual tradition that so many of us religiously follow. It happens around the end of December, somewhere in-between Christmas trees, turkey and family gatherings. You take a piece of paper and reflect on the past year. What went well. What could’ve been better.

Suddenly an epiphany hits you. You’re not satisfied with the direction your life is taking. It needs to change. You create a clear plan for reinventing yourself, buy that gym membership and promise to spend more time on your long-term goals. New year, new you.


Image for post
Image for post

What’s your biggest mistake?

I ask this question myself a lot. I genuinely love doing retrospectives. I do one every day. On top of that I also do weekly retros, and monthly ones, and quarterly ones, and sure thing I do my annual retro sometime in late December. You get the point.

Reflecting so much on what I did well and what I could have done better makes it actually hard to pinpoint a single specific action that I regret. There is a fair number of them. …


Image for post
Image for post

If I asked you to take a good look at everyday objects around you and think of ones that don’t work and can’t be rationally explained why they are like that, what would come to your mind?

I know I’ll certainly think about medicine instruction leaflets. You know a fold-in paper that goes in a box with almost any medicine? One of those fuckers with a fine print?


Image for post
Image for post

It was a hot August day in Cyprus. I was outside, eating a local candy. One of those middle eastern sweets that melt in your mouth. It was delicious, but every time I took a bite, several crumbs dropped to the ground.

Just minutes later dozens of ants surrounded those pieces and started doing something magical.


Image for post
Image for post

Look at your body. Notice every pore and every hair, pay attention to every curve. Now, zoom in. Imagine passing through your skin and seeing what’s underneath. Blood running through the veins, your bones, your digestive system, your beating heart. Zoom even deeper. Zoom to the smallest cells.

Each of those cells has its purpose. Each has the job it does. It’s a small biological machine that does specific tasks in order to keep your whole body alive and well.

What if one cell stops doing its job? Probably the organism as a whole won’t be impacted that much. …


Image for post
Image for post

Imagine yourself lost in the wilderness. Nobody around. No signs of where you need to get to. You are roaming, choosing one direction, then another, then back to the initial one. Night falls. Will you find a place you need to get to? Maybe.

Now, imagine you are still there, still lost, but this time, you have a map on your smartphone that shows you where you are and gives you directions. Will you find a place you need to get to? Most certainly.

When it comes to a career, people find themselves similarly lost. Sometimes they have a clear…


Image for post
Image for post

“I quit.”

How many times have you heard one of your teammates say that?

People leave, that’s a part of life. The problem with employee turnover is not just the fact of leaving though. Problem is, nobody makes a decision to leave in an instant — it’s a gradual realization.

First, you understand you don’t like something about the place you work in. Maybe you try to address and change it, maybe you don’t feel empowered enough and just silently disagree.

Then, your engagement starts deteriorating, you are not motivated anymore, you stop believing in a company, start looking for…


Image for post
Image for post

In his best-selling book, The Hard Things about Hard Things, Ben Horowitz mentioned, that every company early on has two main objectives which are based on products and profits. You need to build something that is 10x better than any competition and do it fast enough to win the market.

Frankly, there is perhaps simply no capacity for you to even think about stuff like the culture at that point. The startup boneyard is full of companies with a world-class culture who failed to deliver on product or profit. Culture is for folks like Google, right?

Well, data shows that…


Image for post
Image for post

Writing the biggest check is not enough anymore to engage and retain people in companies. And it makes us better humans.

Just a mere fifteen decades ago lots of people were still considered to be tools to get work done. Literally, by being slaves.

Fifty years ago the majority of the population continued to work their asses off and still were considered nothing but cogs in big mechanisms. Hopefully, just metaphysically now.

Twenty-five years ago most people were working in office cubicles, doing classic 9 to 5, making sure they looked busy the whole day and then leaving home.

People…


Image for post
Image for post

“Let’s make an automated farm!” — Bohdan said expressively.

We were sitting in a small Cuban restaurant, discussing the next product we should build while chewing burritos and drinking non-alcoholic mojitos.

Our story started 5 years earlier. It was February. Too mild for Kiev, Ukraine. I was sitting in a cheap coffee shop with a guy I just met in person, discussing big ideas and how they would change the world.

I was still a sophomore student and knew very little about marketing, or design, or business. Bohdan, a guy in front of me, was a talented developer, who recently…

Teambit

Teambit helps teams create high performing cultures by making feedback a daily habit.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store