The ‘Golden Age’ of getting lost is officially over
Hanne Elisabeth Tidnam
547

Since I still recall road trips from the 1950s, I can vouch for much of this. And I take your point. However, knowing where you are is no sure cure for getting lost in the sense of not being where you want to be. And this is all the more true for the percentage of people who can’t make any sense of maps. It’s the relationship between where you are and where you want to go that is most important.

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