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image via npr.org — Scott Eisen/Getty Images

This endorsement was originally posted on Facebook on the evening of Monday, March 2, 2020. Lightly edited here.

I believe Elizabeth Warren is the best candidate for president. I voted for her, along with a full progressive down-ballot slate. (In SF I love the League Of Pissed Off Voters.) I believe Elizabeth Warren is brilliant, committed to the people, and, to use Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s words (even though she endorsed and is campaigning for Sanders), Warren shows “political courage.” She called out Michael Bloomberg to his face for his atrocious stop-and-frisk policy, which is really a state sanctioned genocide policy, as well as for being a serial sexual harrasser and billionaire, just like Trump. …


Reading Das Kapital is hard. I’ve tried it, and I recommend it. But reading novels is more enjoyable, easier, and dramatizes the hard work of socialist organizing, when people come together to demand their fair share of the value they produce as workers.

If you want to understand why more and more Americans are identifying with the working class, and why you might be one of them, try these novels (plus one nonfiction book and one film) — and buy them somewhere else than Amazon, if you can.

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Tessa Thompson in Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You

This 1982 Chilean novel tells a multi-generational, magical realist story of a Chilean family. By following this privileged family with glimpses of the radicalizing peasants who work their country estate, we learn about the exploitative relationships ultimately fought by politicians like Allende’s cousin, assassinated Chilean leader Salvador Allende. …


Why doesn’t Medium have a “Write” icon in the top right corner like twitter? It feels like this site has become a place for readers, not writers. Or professional writers only, not bloggers. A bit more UX difficulty keeps the riffraff out, inaccessible design on purpose…

Anyway, I said I was going to publish here every day.

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Playground break in the distance in Nusa Lembongan, Indonesia. Photo by me, because I surfed there.

That was last Friday. I said I’d take Saturdays off. Now it’s Wednesday. What can I say, I was in professional development. Also after my first post I felt squeamish, like maybe what I wrote was wrong or embarrassing or some kind of self-sabotage as I enter the job market again. I read through it ten times. Nothing was too honest, I wasn’t being too vulnerable, it was just…my voice. Sometimes that is vulnerability enough. Our professional representations of ourselves are not our real selves. I am trying to fashion a professional ethos. I want to be a tenure-track professor. I am willing my subjectivity into my desired futures. I am buying blazers. I am wearing them casually. I am rejecting my employer’s identification of me as an academic service provider. When people see me in a restaurant, or at a party, I want them to see a queer woman who teaches writing, hiphop, and social media studies at Stanford. In fact, this is who I am. …


I started this just now, on the fire escape.

I was enjoying the full moon, even though I couldn’t see it.

I challenged myself to write a Medium post every day.

The full moon visible through clouds in the night sky
The full moon visible through clouds in the night sky
Via livescience.com. With article “On Friday the 13th, Don’t Be Freaked Out by the ‘Micromoon’.” Original caption: The full micromoon adds a little extra creepiness to Friday the 13th. (Image: © Viacheslav Lopatin/Shutterstock)

Who knows — the way time works, this may be the only one I write. I might start here, shower you with grand promises, vow to check on on this first measly entry in a month, or a year —

Any writer knows that a week would be a success.

Maybe I should take off Sundays. Or Saturdays, because I’m a Jew —

Wow, is it a time to be Jewish. I keep saying I’m glad my grandparents aren’t here to see it. They died believing in Progress. I’ve studied Critical Race Theory — also lived through the last 33 years of world history, and studied other parts of it as well (you could even say — I sometimes do — that I’m a historian) — so I don’t. …


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from Glamour.com

He called me a nasty woman, so here we are. I’m here to show Donald what a nasty woman looks like. What a nasty woman can do. I’m here to tell you that I am officially putting my campaign’s resources behind challenging Donald Trump, because the American people voted for me by close to three million votes. The people voted, and they voted for me. As a public servant, I listen to the people, and I fight for a government that responds to their demands.

To come here tonight, to face you, has been a difficult decision. I feel ashamed; I feel exhausted; I feel, in a deep way, that this move is courting danger. In fact, I have tried, for most of my life, to not be a nasty woman: to have a respectable career, to be a loyal wife, a devoted mother, a public servant. When it seemed, on November 8th, that I had not been elected, I did the least nasty thing I could do: I conceded, quickly and cleanly, in deference to our nation’s traditions and institutions, and with respect for the smooth transition of power. …


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from Reuters via the New York Times. Gun stocks from Smith & Wesson and Sturm, Ruger have risen even faster than Apple over Obama’s presidential terms

In an interview last week with Essence, Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza said, “if we’re serious about making the types of changes that need to happen, we need to be really serious about redirecting resources. Why are we paying tax dollars to departments that continue to murder our people? I don’t want to pay for people to kill us, and I don’t think anybody in our communities want that.”

Many have been wondering how to support the Movement for Black Lives. Garza points to a revolutionary option: stop paying our taxes. We need to educate ourselves, listen to voices of color, attend protests, and voice concerns to elected representatives. …


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Facebook’s backup generators in Oregon — by Steve Dykes for the New York Times

Calling it the “cloud” invokes a light, airy space where nothing really exists except as water vapor. In fact, the industrial and electronic infrastructure that houses the cloud, where individual Internet users as well as public and private institutions increasingly store their files, including photos, video, music, documents, and metadata, is a physical infrastructure of enormous servers and physical cable network that consumes vast quantities of mined precious hard metals, consumes and pollutes water, and runs on on- and off-grid electricity produced by coal, natural gas, and green methods like solar and wind. Beyond the private servers that private and public institutions use to store their files, the proliferation of data is driving companies to invest in bigger, faster, and more environmentally damaging server farms. And although these environmental costs have been covered in The New York Times and The Atlantic, most Internet users are blissfully unaware of the actual workings behind our daily Internet habits. …


Because they do.

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from nbcnews.com

On Friday afternoon, Black Lives Matters protestors disrupted a Bernie Sanders rally in Seattle.

From the crowd there were calls that the protestors should be arrested or even tased, prompting Black Lives Matter Seattle founder Marissa Janae Johnson to declare, “I was going to tell Bernie how racist Seattle is, but you already did this for you.”

Since then, discussion has raged over Black Lives Matter-Seattle’s choices. Bernie’s defenders have wondered aloud: Why interrupt the most left candidate? Why not protest the Republican debate? Why not interrupt Hillary Clinton? And, more defensively, don’t the protestors understand Sanders is their best bet? Don’t other peoples’ concerns matter? Is this kind of raucous misbehavior the real way to get change? And supporters of BLM-Seattle have replied: Yes. …


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Andre van vegten via flickr.com

“Cristóbal Colón _____________ America.”

In the morning Ali stood in her school parking lot still wearing the faded lemon colored sweater, the same dirty jeans and scuffed ballet flats she’d worn in jail. She’d spent the night in her car, sleeping (like Wallo) with the passenger seat pushed all the way back, after refusing a kind neighbor’s offer of a sunken couch.

Under dawn’s vaulted ceilings she rifled through the duffel in her trunk, evincing a clean oxford, a cardigan, different jeans. The flats would stay, witness to the faulty adventure.

In her classroom she opened a window and welcomed the autumn breeze into this small space that was hers. She unpacked her lunch into a low empty desk drawer and arranged her pens and pulled a folder of graded work and lesson plans out of her tote and placed it on a pile at the right-hand side of that surface, grateful at least that her students’ work had not burned, that she would get through the day unnoticed, that her douche in the women’s restroom was the only aberration to this early Tuesday morn. Yes, today was Tuesday, tomorrow was Wednesday already, and then it was practically weekend. …


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mcsreedev via flickr.com

The highway swung around the skyline, taking in the glitter from all sides.

When they arrived in Chicago, it was dark. The highway swung around the skyline, taking in the glitter from all sides. The car plowed into the heart of the city with the others, and Ali pulled away from the current to deposit Wallo at the stoop of the stone building where he lived.

She took Ashland back to Pilsen. The wide street’s lanes vacillated between four and six, the cars streamed down smoothly. What a pleasure to drive southwards in no traffic, on a mild night, past the storefronts hawking tacos and car wheels with hand-painted signs, past the brick churches with their Central European charm, the stoplights with left turn arrows, the endless repeating array of four-storey mixed-use buildings, stop signs to side streets, pedestrians jaywalking around her. …

About

Tessa Brown

writer, teacher, scholar. Lecturer @Stanford. Chicagoan 4eva.

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