Our roadmap for the next 18 months

Tendermint Core is nearly seven years old, and is used to secure billions of dollars across several significant blockchain ecosystems. And yet, despite this, it’s still considered pre-1.0 software.

Our goal is to fix that.

Although pre-1.0 numbering has allowed core development teams a lot of flexibility, it’s become obvious that this isn’t fair to our users. We can’t use version numbers to signal breaking changes, and our interfaces and encoding systems have often shifted out from underneath our users.

Tendermint Core 1.0’s chief concern is stability. It must be stable enough that people can (continue) to build production software…


Late last year, we quietly released the new version of Tendermint Core which will support the Cosmos Stargate upgrade, v0.34.0. Today we are releasing v0.34.1, which includes bug fixes and other small improvements for the 0.34 release series. This blog post serves as a quick recap of the major features included in this release series, but for a full list of changes, please refer to the changelog, and for detailed notes on breaking changes, see the Upgrading Instructions.

What’s new in Tendermint Core v0.34

Protocol Buffers

Like other Stargate-compatible Cosmos projects, Tendermint Core adopts Protocol Buffers, which has led to big improvements in performance and developer experience. …


Hello, application engineer! Tendermint Core team here. We wanted to write you a note explaining the upcoming serialization format change in Tendermint Core 0.34. This is a state-breaking change, and you’ll have to conduct a network upgrade if you want to use Tendermint Core 0.34 or later.

And you should! 0.34 is going to have some super-useful new features, like state sync, in addition to this big breaking change. It’s also the version of Tendermint which will be required for the Stargate Upgrade.

So here’s what you need to know: This is what we’ve decided to do, and more importantly…


There are several goals of Game of Zones: to educate the public about IBC; to stress test the system in an adversarial and competitive setting; and to shine a light on any potential vulnerabilities in the IBC protocol and implementation. Earlier this week, participants in Game of Zones successfully helped us identify a problem. It wasn’t exactly a bug in IBC, but it was a problem nonetheless. We’re excited to fix it.

I’ll share more on that in a moment, but first, some context:

On Monday, the Iqlusion team, which sometimes also goes by “Cosmos Devs,” posted an update to…


The Tendermint Core team has decided to share our goals and roadmap for 2020. What follows is a list of our objectives for the year, organized around four high-level goals, which are themselves ordered by approximate priority. However, we plan to tackle pieces of each of these goals concurrently.

This list is ambitious: It is possible, even likely, that there’s more outlined here than we can achieve in a year. If you are interested in helping us reach these goals, we’ll be opening up a few new positions soon.

Goal 1: Increase the number of people who can make substantive contributions to Tendermint Core

We’d like to speed up Tendermint’s development process, and as part…


Part 2: Making Money Trustworthy

In Part 1, we learned that Bitcoin is a decentralized currency, not generated or owned by any government or financial institution, and what hashing is. Now, we’ll learn how Bitcoin miners use hashing to literally make money, and how cryptography allows bitcoins to be trustworthy, unique and impervious to copying even though they are completely (and irreversibly) transferrable.

Bitcoin, like the United States dollar, fluctuates in value. …


Part 1: Making Money

Photo by abigail low on Unsplash

Bitcoin is a revolutionary way to save or spend digital money, and has the potential to transform other areas of our lives, too. You also don’t need to be a mathematician or cryptographer to understand it. When you start to see how the system comes full circle, you may just be delighted.

Let’s say I send you a movie over the internet. I attach a file to an email, hit send, and you have it moments later. You can download and watch the movie, or delete it. You can do what you want with it.

But keep this in mind…


Grace Notes is a yearly event which celebrates local women in tech. It happens at the same time as the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC), but they aren’t affiliated in any way.

It started in 2015, as !GHC. And, true to its name, I started it because I wasn’t going to GHC.

I always joke that I was feeling FOMO — and this is true, I was feeling like I was missing out on meeting other amazing women. But that’s not the whole story.

Grace Notes is my take on what “tech feminism” can look like. It…


Talks from Estefania Ortiz, Kat Li, Bianca St.Louis, Star Simpson, and Ellen Pao

Grace Notes is a yearly event celebrating women who work in tech, hosted by Chain and co-sponsored by Lyft and Eatsa. (You can read more about Grace Notes here.)

Estefania Ortiz

Estefania is currently a founder at Greo, a social media platform for people to share their stories and learn from each other’s experiences. She just graduated with a degree in Computer Science from Stanford University, and is originally from Puerto Rico.

Kat Li

Kat is Head of Product at Digit and was previously at Quora and Stripe. She studied linguistics and psychology at Stanford University and therefore enjoys late night conversations about…


I’m excited to share that over the next few weeks, Chain will be hosting two developer events in New York.

First, on November 30, a handful of Chain employees will be holding what we’ve been calling “Office Hours.” Office Hours are an opportunity for folks to come get some one-on-one support and advice, hosted at Work-Bench from 10 AM to 7 PM.

Have protocol questions you want answered? Hitting an unexpected error when creating transactions? Just want some help getting Chain Core running on your computer? Come to Office Hours! …

Tess Rinearson

VP of Engineering, Tendermint Core. (Previously: @Chain, @Medium.)

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