Should the Electoral College be sunset in favor of a national popular vote, our two-party system would be the first casualty.
I would suggest your argument is specious by its assertion that the distribution of the national…
Steve McGrath
252

One of the most ignored and yet dangerous aspects of a “popular vote” is the fact that it can produce quite the opposite intended, and in politics a “can” oft means “it will”.

Once the two party system is minimized, and the barriers to enter any party lowered, then count on a plethora of parties arising, evolving, splitting, and developing factions. 
Thus by destroying a fairly stable two-party system we could develop into a system of factions, none of which would obtain the so-called popular vote, yet one would ascend to power in a runoff.

Ruling by faction would not require local or state affiliations of party, 
nor any need to recognize pressing issues within states, 
thus essentially driving all campaigning strictly into national media.

Bad news.