Yayoi Kusama and her “Infinity Mirrored Rooms” at The Broad Museum

Who is Yayoi Kusama? Well, Yayoi Kusama is a mixed media artist based in a mental institution in Japan. Her escape from the thoughts and craziness from her illness is her art. She has many pieces, including sculptures and paintings, but her most notorious are her Infinity Mirrored Rooms.

What exactly is an Infinity Mirrored Room? It depends. Truly, it really depends. To an everyday person, it’s really just a sculpture or actual room with mirrored walls and some lights. To me, it’s way more than that. At The Broad museum, there are currently two permanent (currently permanent at the time of the writing of this article as there has been no notice or announcement of the exhibits going poof) Infinity Mirrored Rooms (Infinity Mirrored Room — The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away and Infinity Mirrored Room — Longing for Eternity).

What is the first room that the museum has? Infinity Mirrored Room — The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away is an actual room exhibition that is immersive and can be entered in groups or alone. It has mirrored walls, a black ceiling, LED geometric lights hanging from the ceiling in many different hues, a dark gray platform, and a dark floor covered in a layer of water. You only get around 45 seconds to be in the room and take as many pictures or as little pictures as you want. The lights seem to recede forever into infinity and you almost get lost in the surroundings as the LED lights strobe and flash with great brilliance.

Can we see some pictures of Infinity Mirrored Room — The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away? Sure.

These can be found on my Instagram (@thedaviddablo, same as my Medium username). They are subject to automatic copyright from basic United States Copyright laws deeming the photographs owned by me. © 2018 David Dablo ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

What about that second Infinity Mirrored Room? Is it even a room? The second Infinity Mirrored Room, Longing for Eternity, is a mirrored sculpture as opposed to a room. It is located on the third floor of The Broad. It is clearly defined by its mirrored exterior surface with 3 holes at varying heights. Infinity Mirrored Room — Longing for Eternity is a hexagonal mirrored sculpture with lights in a hexagonal pattern with holes to view the exhibit through. It has mirrored walls around the hexagonal mirrored floor. The floor has lights that change color in beautiful patterns.

What seperates this room from the other one? It is a newer installation exhibition, and it is not a room you can enter. Longing for Eternity also has a different view, when you look, you see a ceiling and floor inside the sculpture, but since the surface around the lights is also mirrored, it appears the entire ceiling and floor are 100% covered in the lights.

Okay enough talk, can we see a picture of Longing for Eternity? You sure can!

This can be found on my Instagram (@thedaviddablo, same as my Medium username). They are subject to automatic copyright from basic United States Copyright laws deeming the photographs owned by me. © 2018 David Dablo ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

How can we see these rooms at The Broad? There are currently two ways to see it, I’ve currently only used one of these techniques, but I am certain both will work. Firstly, you need to order tickets on the 1st of the month before the day you want to get there. I went on Tuesday, March 27th, and ordered my tickets on February 1st. I got tickets for the earliest timeslot on that day, which was 11:00am. We arrived at the museum at about 10:25, and waited until a VSA came to my group and scanned our tickets. It was pretty smooth sailing from there. We got in at 11:05 roughly and by 11:10 we already had signed up for our Infinity Mirrored Rooms! By 11:15 we went into The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away and by 11:35 we went into Longing for Eternity. It was such a fun thing just to go and it was such an easy process with the advance tickets from (ticketing.thebroad.org). If you can’t get advance tickets, you need to wait in the general admission line as early as possible, and just wait. You’ll eventually get in and will be able to sign up for the rooms.

How did you take those really brilliant amazing photos of the rooms? Well for The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, I used an iPhone X and a Canon 6D Mark III. On the iPhone X, I just used the normal camera app for the self portraits and its Portrait Mode feature for the close up lights with bokeh. On the Canon 6D Mark III, I used the Aperature-Priority mode and set the aperture to an f/2.8. The lens I used has autofocus, which was great for the close ups with the lights, and I used manual focus for the self portraits. I also found that the front facing portrait mode on the iPhone X was extremely useful for selfies! For Longing for Eternity, it was a different story, since there were no lights that are hanging to take close ups on. On the Canon 6D Mark III, I used the Scene Intelligence (automatic settings) mode with NO-FLASH. Let me emphasize, NO-FLASH at all. For one, it ruins the artwork, and flash photography is and was never allowed at The Broad museum, along with flash also ruining the photos you take. On the iPhone X, I used Halide with manual focus to get the best shots of the room as possible.

Where can we find the rest of your pictures from your trip? Easily you can find them on my public Instagram account (@thedaviddablo), or my public Twitter with the same username.

Hope you really enjoyed this article I wrote. It’s very easy to write about my passions and interests on this platform, but it does take time, and clapping for my work is greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!

Sources: thebroad.org, ticketing.thebroad.org, wikipedia.com, and yayoi-kusama.jp