Rolling With Climate Change

Every conversation about climate change seems to result in eye rolls, groans and various noises of displeasure. In 2012, Bill McKibben penned an article for Rolling Stone magazine about the alleged threat posed by climate change. Regardless of the numbers thrown at us by liberals and conservatives and everyone in between, one thing is certain: nobody knows how this is going to play out.

People can only absorb so much information, and they are already suffering from an overload. Depending on the audience, an article like McKibben’s might be emphasized and summarized differently.

For a climate change specialist:

The Copenhagan climate change conference of 2009 was important for world governments to find common ground about the most cost-effective methods to reduce carbon emissions, especially in developing nations where energy needs are greatest.

For a junior high student:

The number of gigatons of carbon that get released into the atmosphere is like the legal drinking limit- carbon is fun but only until the point where it becomes dangerous and therefore illegal.

For a fundraising professional:

As Barack Obama told his supporters, his election would mark the day that “the rise of the oceans began to slow and the planet began to heal.” It is important that we not give up our work to prevent a global catastrophe now that this global issue has finally been brought to the front of the public’s awareness.

Too many issues have become partisan. We must return to objective facts and try to remain impartial. As he wrote, individual actions make no impact that we can feel, but a multitude acting in concert will have benefits that future generations will either thank or curse us for.

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