An open-source plan to adapt fully-featured design tools like Figma from desktop to tablet.

As a product designer, I really only need two pieces of tech for my day-to-day:

  1. A computer to handle the product(ivity) side of things — think web apps
  2. A design tool — where I usually design web apps

And, like most designers, I relied on two “standards of the industry” for a while:

  1. A MacBook Pro
  2. Sketch

But, if you note the past-tense, two things happened:

  1. In 2018, I closed a Sketch window and opened up my friend’s Figma file for the first time. Figma didn’t only instantly replace Sketch, it also replaced other tools I had been using at…


The race to win the trillion dollars no blinking contest

Courtesy of Wired

In 2001, a Stanford professor and a couple of his prodigies drove over to meet Larry Page and Sergey Brin for a secret coffee meeting. The co-founders of Google had an idea: what if you could teleport onto any road in the world?

Six years later, Sebastian Thrun and his team of Google Earthers launched Street View, but, for them, looking through a screen wasn’t good enough. They didn’t want to travel to a street thousands of miles away digitally, they wanted to be driven there.


A case study providing a way for self-driving cars to communicate their intentions on the road. (Self-driving startups aren’t solving this problem, so I conducted a case study looking into it.)

You’re walking down the sidewalk and reach the intersection at the same time as an Uber. The driver raises his hand off the wheel and waves, motioning you to cross. A minute later you reach a second intersection right after another car does. The driver lifts his hand, telling you that they’re going first.

But as you reach the next intersection, a self-driving taxi comes to a stop. How do you know what its plans are? Should you go first or does its AI brain think the car should?

This question is being asked across the autonomy world: how can…


The Emailer’s Guide To The Galaxy: Part III

How can I track this email?

As I discussed in my previous two posts, I’m 17, so my network isn’t too big just yet. For me, cold emails are the easiest and most direct way to reach a founder. Over the past year, I’ve sent over 100 emails to CEO’s, founders, and heads of design, and have figured out how to ensure a response.

Contrary to what most people think, emailing isn’t as simple as writing, sending, and waiting. Once you click the send button, the journey’s only getting started.

Quick note: this is the third post in a series all about cold-emailing. If you haven’t…


The Emailer’s Guide To The Galaxy: Part II

The start of my cold email

As I explained in my last post, I’m 17, so my network isn’t too big just yet. For me, cold emails are the easiest and most direct way to reach a founder. Over the past year, I’ve sent over one hundred emails to CEO’s, founders, and heads of design, and have gotten a response from over 80% of them.

My emails started out unconventionally — filled with long paragraphs, massive intros, and frankly, very little about the recipient. But, with A/B tests, just the right amount of analytics, and persistence, I was able to notice what stuck.

Most people just…


The Emailer’s Guide To The Galaxy: Part I

How do I find that CEOs email?

I’m 17, so my network isn’t too big, just yet. For me, cold emails are the easiest and most direct way to reach a founder. Over the past year, I’ve found out not only how to find a tech leader’s work email address, but their personal one as well.

In this post, I’ll teach you the ins and outs of searching for anyone in tech’s email address. So, sit down, download Google Chrome, open your Gmail, and let’s get to work.

Part 1: The easy way out

The easiest email to find is a work email, but this is a double-edged sword. …


It’s as easy as thumb, two, three.

In most apps, it’s common to see a search bar up at the top of the screen. On social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and even Snapchat, the search bar is at the top of almost every main screen. In transportation apps, that style is almost ubiquitous.


It might seem that we’ve come a long way from Mad Men, the 1960's, where men sat at desks inside offices while female secretaries sat outside. Today, not only are women inside the office, they’re sitting in the C-suite. Just to name a few:

  • Sheryl Sandberg, COO @ Facebook
  • Susan Wojcicki, CEO @ YouTube
  • Ginni Rometty, CEO @ IBM
  • Angela Ahrendts, Senior VP @ Apple
  • Ruth Porat, CFO @ Alphabet
  • Gwynne Shotwell, COO @ SpaceX

Yet, as women have gained respect and power in the workplace, a new wave of female assistants has come about: the ones living in…


At WWDC17, I sat down with John Geleynse to hear feedback on Tower. In the middle of the conversation, I tried to justify our original swiping-based interface by mentioning Snapchat. John jumped up and said, “Never use Snapchat as a reference for UX again.”

As the Head of Design and Engineering Evangelism at Apple, it made sense that he was right. Less than a year later, Snapchat released an update to make their app more user-friendly, trying to appeal to an audience with a greater age range.

Even with horrible UX, kids my age are still flocking to Snapchat and…

Theo Strauss

17. Writing about the design of the future and the future of design. Creating @ theostrauss.com and interning @ serve.postmates.com

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