Deciding between Monochromatic or Analogous Color Harmonies for your data visualization

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Today, I discuss the color impact of choosing between a Monochromatic or an Analogous color harmony in your data visualizations. A Monochromatic color harmony combines one hue (a 100% saturated color) with various tints, tones and shades of that hue to create a color scheme. The Analogous Color Harmony combines three or more colors that are next to each to other on the Color Wheel to form a color scheme. Using the same data set, the presentation results can have different visual and perceptual impacts. These color choices can create subtle as well as obvious visual impressions about your data. …


Applying the Analogous Color Harmony to data visualizations

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The Analogous Color Harmony refers to selecting colors that are next to each other on the Color Wheel. This harmony is one of the easiest to create and one of the easiest to fail color deficiency tests. It can especially be difficult for someone with normal color vision to differentiate between two colors that are adjacent on the color wheel. A color deficiency can add to the challenge of distinguishing between such adjacent color. In this writing, I will discuss how Adobe Color can be used to create effective Analogous color harmonies, that pass color deficiency tests, for your data visualizations. I also show how some of ColorBrewer’s Multi-Hue Sequential color schemes turn out to be Analogous Color Harmonies. …


Using a complementary color harmony to build a diverging color scheme for data visualization

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In this writing, I discuss an approach to creating your own Diverging Color color themes for data visualization. This facilitates capturing the attention of your viewers and setting up the environment for a unique and memorable visual presentation of your results. As a reminder, a Diverging color theme places equal emphasis on both a specified mid-range value as well as two extreme critical values.

By joining two fundamental principals from color theory, customized results for Diverging color schemes can be achieved. …


How to Tame Vibrating Boundaries in your Data Visualizations

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A Complementary Color Harmony is defined as two colors that oppose each other on the Color Wheel. In Red Green Blue (RGB) Color Space, two fully saturated complementary color lights, when combined, will produce White light. The results can be vivid. In this writing, I discuss how a fully saturated complementary color scheme might pass color deficiency tests but become too difficult for people with normal color vision to view for an extended period of time. This can result in viewers having difficulty following the narrative in your data visualization. …


Expand your color toolbox with the Pantone Connect app

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Pantone Connect is a recently released app for selecting Pantone colors or for extracting Pantone colors from images on your desktop or mobile devices. Personalized color palettes can be digitally created from Pantone’s color library of more than 10,000 hues. In this writing, I discuss how the Pantone Connect app can be used to facilitate the process of creating data visualizations by combining it with other tools like Viz Palette and the Color Blindness Simulator — Coblis. …


Creating a Bubble Chart Visualization with a Diad Color Harmony

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Combining two colors that are two steps apart on the Color Wheel creates a Diad Color Harmony. This Color Harmony is one of the lesser used ones. I decided to cover it here to add variety to your options for colorizing visualizations.

As noted in my earlier Nightingale writings, color harmony is the process of choosing colors on a Color Wheel that work well together in the composition of an image. “The Blues of Color Harmony” noted the similarities between color harmony and musical harmony. …


From colorizing to printing a data visualization

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As noted in my earlier Nightingale writings, color harmony is the process of choosing colors on a Color Wheel that work well together in the composition of an image. Today, I will step further into color theory by discussing the Split Complementary Color Harmony and apply it to a data visualization example. Most importantly, I discuss moving between display (RGB) and printing (CMYK) color spaces. Indeed there are many situations that require moving beyond digital results to produce a physical output. Unfortunately, colors frequently lose their vibrancy when transitioning from the RGB to the CMYK color spaces.To …


Creating a classic triad harmony with Adobe Color

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Today, I discuss how to apply the Triad or Triadic Color Harmony to data visualizations. This harmony uses three colors that are evenly spaced around the Color Wheel. Successful use of a Triad color harmony involves balancing the resulting three vibrant color elements.

I will start by using the Adobe Color web app to create a specific Triad color theme. This follows with the use of the recently added Adobe Color “accessibility tools”, designed to address individuals with limited color vision. From there, the triad color theme is applied to a Donut visualization example. To be extra careful in addressing color deficiencies, I run the Donut Visualization through the Color Blindness Simulator, Coblis. …


Exploring a tetrad color harmony with Paletton.com and Viz Palette

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In this writing, I discuss how to create a Tetrad Color Harmony with the freely accessible color scheme design tool called Paletton.com. The resulting color theme is then applied to a bar chart visualization. Visually, the Tetrad Color Harmony uses four colors that form a rectangle on the Color Wheel. I will then show how to use Viz Palette to quickly assess how the selected color scheme might appear with other information visualization examples. The similarities between a tetrad color theme shown under the Paletton.com Mondrianish display and a Viz Palette Treemap simulation are also featured.

Both Paletton.com — the Color Scheme Designer and Viz Palette are freely accessible online tools for your continued use. Let’s begin the discussion here by exploring how Paletton.com supports Color Harmony. …


How to colorize a hurricane viz using Paletton.com and the Albers app

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Building on my earlier article on “Colorizing a Visualization”, our journey with extending the “Interaction of Color” app beyond a learning experience continues. Previously, I described how I used ColorBrewer to colorize a hurricane visualization. Today, I explore a different approach to creating color schemes for the same scientific data but with different tools: Paletton.com and the Albers or Interaction of Color App.

About

Theresa-Marie Rhyne

Theresa-Marie Rhyne is a color expert. Her book on “Applying Color Theory to Digital Media and Visualization” was published by CRC Press in 2016.

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