Hello, world!


I don’t know exactly how to start this, but I believe that first things come first. And it’s always polite to introduce ourselves when we start to talk to somebody who still doesn’t know us. By the way, I’d like to apologize in advance for any mistake I make. I’m about to write more than I’ve ever written and I’ll do this without help of any grammar or dictionary. So, let’s move on.

My name is Adair Júnior, I’m Brazilian, 37 years old. I live in Rio Grande do Sul, which is a state located in the south of Brazil and depending on the season of the year it has extreme opposite temperatures (it has the lowest temperatures in winters and sometimes the highest temperatures in summers). I need to confess that I hate this. And just for the record: Spanish isn’t the official language in Brazil. We speak Portuguese (a slight variant from Portuguese spoken in Portugal) and we don’t have monkeys walking on the streets. Ok, the last part was a joke (a bad one, I guess).

“Ok freak, but why the hell are you doing this?” First of all, this is my debut writing an article, an essay, or whatever piece of text in English. Actually, I took too long to do it, but better later than never. Second, I need to improve every of my English skills — reading, listening, pronunciation, conversation and, of course, writing.

My English education, like everyone else here in Brazil, started in school using the traditional and boring way: textbooks. As you can guess, I learned something close to nothing. Of course it was a loooong time ago. Despite that tragic experience, I always dreamt about understand English perfectly and feel confortable talking to foreign people. But recently (and by “recently” I mean 6 or 7 years ago) I realized that I’d never achieve that goal if I do nothing. So, I started to study English by myself — if you take a look at my profile, you’ll see that I’m a self-taught guy. And finally I saw real progress, getting skills I’ve never had at that time. However, it wasn’t enough because I could read and understand “everything”, but when it came to listen, I used to feel completely lost. So I started to watch movies and TV shows, sometimes with English subtitles, sometimes with any subtitle at all. Of course I didn’t understand nothing in the beginning, but I got used to that (and also to these addictive TV shows). And I started to understand more and more. But it still wasn’t enough. I wanted to be able to talk.

Then I realized one more thing: I never gonna be able to talk if I don’t… talk. And that, my friend, is the toughest part. It happens because I never went to the US, or to the UK, or any place where English is the official language. And since I don’t have resources enough to pay for English lessons (at least for now I have other priorities), It’s really hard to find people willing to talk to a guy who maybe doesn’t have their expected level. Fortunatelly, I’ve found a way to get over the speaking challenge and I believe I’m doing a good job. I promise I’ll talk about this topic in a near future.

Nowadays, I feel proud when I remember the path I’ve followed and that I did it all alone, thanks to my efforts and also my determination. I’m still not sure about how often I’ll bring a new article, but I’m thinking that twice a week could be good. And, of course, I want to share a bit about my methods, my goals, my achievements and, hopefully, the end of the road to fluency.

See you soon!

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