Deep Water: The Hundred Year-old Wells of Kampung Hakka Mantin

The 100 year old traditions of Kampung Hakka are under threat, reports Sharon Chin

Links:After surviving 120 years, Kampung Hakka may fall to modern times”, Malay Mail Online, 15 July 2014 | Rakan Mantin Facebook group | Kampung Hakka Facebook page
* The widely reported statistic of 5000 billion m3 comes from a study conducted in 1982. Considering what development has wrought on our natural landscape in that time, its viability is questionable. The 7% recharge rate is from a 2012 study, and gives a more accurate picture of our groundwater — it means that of the 974 billion m3 of rain Malaysia gets every year, 64 billion m3 is stored underground. See “Caveat over large-scale groundwater extraction”, 6 May 2014, The Sun Daily.
** Sime Darby’s 2009 Annual Report states that the groundwater project is commencing its development stage, while the 2010 Annual Report states that it is under review. For opposition to the project, see “Study Report on Groundwater Resources Development Project in the District of Batang Padang, Perak Darul Ridzuan — A Reminder to Malaysia” by Federation of Malaysian Consumers (FOMCA), Water and Energy Consumer Association of Malaysia (WECAM) and Forum Air Malaysia. See also Sime Darby’s response: “Groundwater is a Sustainable and Reliable Source of Water”, 25 Aug 2009. Other Links:In search of water”, The Star Online, 3 March 2014 | “Study on Groundwater Contamination in North Kelantan”, National Hydraulic Institute of Malaysia (NAHRIM), 18 April 2014 | “Spritzer’s competitive edge”, The Star Online, 16 February 2013 | Google satellite map of Spritzer’s bottling facility and surrounding water catchment area

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This piece was edited by Ling Low. It first appeared on Poskod.my in 2015.

This is Part 2 of ‘In The Land That Never Was Dry’, a series of illustrated journalism pieces about water issues in Malaysia, supported by Krishen Jit ASTRO Fund. Read Part 1 and Part 3:

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