Why Schopenhauer died poor and unpopular
Alex Moody
135

I couldn’t say how many of these folks writing self help or life hack articles are being dishonest versus how many genuinely believe what they put out there could be helpful for someone. Not my place to determine or project their intentions.

I honestly believe that anyone can change things for themselves if they wanted to. It’s much harder for some over others due to variables like finances and social status, but when it comes right down to it, for most of us it’s just will. It just comes down to how hard we’re willing to work pitted directly against how much work needs to be done. The problem is that “Set a goal and work hard” isn’t so easy that anyone can do it. That’s why most don’t.

I think deep down we know all know there are no quick fixes to the momentum of our lives, but we love to believe. It’s why there’s an industry for fad diets or the articles you describe. On some level, I see that desire to improve as somewhat beautiful in it’s own way. Us humans want to figure it out and do better. I’d say at the very least, realizing there’s something you want to change is a good start. We just gotta stop hoping for the cheats that were never there and get to grindin’. Maybe if we embrace our inner Schopenhauer realist along with that motivational blogger, more of us could get where we want to be.

Thank you for the piece, Alex. I enjoyed it.

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