If Vince Had Gone Down…

Vince McMahon has always loved his bodybuilders and big larger than life physiques, especially in the 1980s, with Hulk Hogan, Ultimate Warrior and Randy Savage positioned in the top positions in the company. Vince firmly believed that superhuman physiques equaled revenue, however, the vast majority of these super-physiques were illegally chemically enhanced. Steroid use was rife in the old WWF, despite that fact the only legal means to obtain them was for a Doctor to prescribe them. Vince McMahon seemingly found his way around this, and hired Dr George Zahorian to distribute them for him. However in 1991 the
 Federal Government convicted Zahorian for illegal distribution of anabolic steroids, and with that Vince McMahon soon found himself facing the biggest legal battle of his life.

The prosecution claimed that Vince McMahon repeatedly urged his wrestlers to illegally use steroids and regularly handed wrestlers advances with the understanding that they used them to purchase steroids directly from Zahorian. He was also accused of trying to cover himself by using untraceable bank cheques for Zahorian, and ordering staff to destroy any
 company records that dealt with the doctor.

The worst case scenario would have seen Vince McMahon facing 11 years in jail and fined $1 million. However, thanks to a lack of evidence and a fabricated testimony from Kevin Wacholz, Vince walked away in the summer of 1994 a free man. Kevin Wacholz appeared in WWE as Nailz, an ex-convict character. Wacholz was released from his WWF contract in December 1992, after he allegedly attacked Vince McMahon in his office over a financial dispute. It is believed that Wacholz “violently choked McMahon.” The incident led to a series of lawsuits between Wacholz and the WWF, with Wacholz alleging that McMahon had given him steroids on a number of occasions; He also filed a wrongful termination lawsuit. The WWF filed counterclaims against Wacholz. In 1994, Wacholz testified against McMahon during his trial, claiming McMahon had told him to take steroids. His testimony included the comment “I hate Vince McMahon’s guts.” Several other wrestlers, including Hulk Hogan, also testified at the trial. If Vince McMahon had been sent down and spent 1994–2005 in jail, it would have been interesting to see steered the ship of the WWF. Shane McMahon too young, Linda McMahon has never been involved in the booking side of the business and Gorilla Monsoon was too old and unhealthy. The most likely scenario would have seen an under-fire Pat Patterson return to WWE to formulate a board of bookers, working under Jerry Jarrett, who had already been spoken to about the role. Other board members would have included Gorilla Monsoon, Shane McMahon and Tony Garea. It’s mind-boggling to think where the WWE would be now, if of all those key decisions that would have been left to somebody else.

The Attitude era would have come and gone, the battle with WCW, the Monday Night Wars, the Montreal Screwjob and key booking decisions. Would Austin 3:16 of ever happened without Vince there to make a call? The WWF may have been a different place had Vince McMahon been found guilty in the 1994 steroid trial. Without Vince running things it’s impossible to speculate on how the
 1994–2005 period would have panned out. I personally don’t think McMahon would have served any serious time had he been found guilty, with 6–12 months (with probation), being the most likely outcome. The fact Vince McMahon was long cleared off distributing steroids and was only being accused of encouraging his stars to use them would have almost certainly lead to a much-reduced sentence. The Superstars were grown men, who were responsible for their own actions.

It’s far easier to look at how WWF would have been booked had McMahon gone to jail for this significantly reduced period, where I still believe the WWF would have been run by the earlier aforementioned board, lead by Jerry Jarrett. Steps had already been taken as early as 1992, to take the WWF in a new direction, and believe the WWF would have simply continued to follow the new course set in 1992, which began with the departure of Hulk Hogan and installing the smaller Bret Hart as temporary face of the WWF. The original plan was for WrestleMania VIII in 1992 to feature the dream match between Ric Flair and Hogan but soon after was changed to a double main event featuring Flair vs. Randy Savage and Hogan vs. Sid. Ric Flair came to the WWF following a dispute with new WCW Vice President Jim Herd. One of Herd’s first acts as VP was to decide that at 42, Ric Flair was “too old,” to be a top star. After turning down an insulting pay cut, Flair was fired by Herd. Flair proceeded to pick up the phone to Vince McMahon at the WWF, which ended up with WWF having both Ric Flair and Hulk Hogan on their roster. The fantasy match-up was imminent; however, it never happened on the big stage (the pair did clash in a few house show markets). The reason for this was down to the fact Hulk Hogan was leaving the WWF. Refer the chapter WrestleMania VIII for how I believe the WWF could have got around this and this still staged the match at WrestleMania.

The main reason Hulk Hogan was leaving the company, was to alleviate the heat that surrounded him, due to Hogan’s disastrous appearance on the Arsenio Hall show, where he claimed he had only used Steroids for injuries. He appeared on July 16, 1991, and the steroid trial was in the news at this point. Hulk Hogan approached the Arsenio Hall show and said he wanted to clear the air and his conscience by coming clean on the show. Everybody expected him to admit to his steroid abuse and tell the children who admire him that he had made a mistake and that he was cleaning himself and his sport up and that they shouldn’t use anabolic steroids. Apparently, this was the case up to the moment that Hulk Hogan walked out on stage. Somehow, the “misguided athlete comes clean” story never came out of Hogan’s mouth and all involved at the Arsenio Hall were said to be furious at Hulk Hogan for misleading them. Everybody ran around after the show saying that they would never have wrestlers on the show again. Despite this claim, Randy Savage would appear on Arsenio Hall on July 31, 1992. WWF World Champion at the time, Randy Savage admitting that he experimenting with steroids, pointing out that the muscle-enhancing drugs were legal when he did so. The backlash grew when several ex-wrestlers came out and called Hogan out about dishonesty. In addition to that, the WWF was also operating under the cloud of a sexual scandal that stemmed from the 1992 claims of sexual harassment from former ring attendant Tony Cole, enhancement talent Barry O and announcer Murray Hodgekins directed toward executives Pat Patterson and Terry Garvin. The case was quickly settled out of court, with Garvin and Patterson both fired (although Patterson was shortly re-hired). McMahon also found himself at the centre of a sexual harassment suit. WWF employee Rita Chatterson claimed that McMahon had demanded sexual favours while she was riding in his limo and when she refused, she was denied work. The limo driver attempted to corroborate her story, but the case was dismissed due to a lack of evidence. The heat was on the WWF, and especially Hogan, who was often used as the face of the scandal in the media. Hogan’s numbers began to decline at the box office and for the first time in his career, boos became audible during his matches. A mutual decision was made for Hogan to remove himself from the firing line after WrestleMania, and as Hogan was leaving, he could not defeat Ric Flair for the WWF Title on the way out. Hulk Hogan would later go on to admit to his Steroid use during the McMahon trial. Here is the full transcript of his testimony.

Government: When did you first work in the WWF?
 Terry B: Late 78. I worked for capital for a couple of years. I was gone for three years. I came back at the end of 83.
 Government: Have you used steroids prior to the WWF?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: When did you start?
 Terry B: The middle of 76.
 Government: What sort?
 Terry B: Injectables and orals. Anabol, decagabril, testosterone. I used deca the most.
 Government: Describe steroid use in the WWF back then.
 Terry B: It was common.
 Government: Give a percentage.
 Terry B: 75 to 80 percent.Maybe more.
 Government: Did you see them in the locker room?
 Terry B: Yes
 Government: Did you use them there?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Did you know Zahorian while you were in the WWF?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Who was he?
 Terry B: He was a commissioned Dr for the state of Pennsylvania that came to taping in Allentown and Hershey.
 Government: What else was he known for?
 Terry B: For wrestlers to get substances. Steroids.
 Government: What else?
 Terry B: Sleeping pills, diet pills, Tylenol 3 and 4.
 Government: How did he distribute?
 Terry B: People came to see him during TV tapings and asked for what they needed.
 Government: Did he take blood tests?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Did he follow up on the wrestlers?
 Terry B: Asked if I was okay.
 Government: Did he give you whatever you asked for?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: What did Zahorian have with him?
 Terry B: A medical bag with instruments and two tackle boxes with drugs.
 Government: Was Vince McMahon ever in the arena when Zahorian was there?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Have you ever heard any slang for steroids?
 Terry B: Juice, gas.
 Government: Ever hear Vince McMahon use them.
 Terry B: Not that I can remember.
 Government: Did Vince McMahon ever order from Zahorian?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Do you recall when?
 Terry B: When we discussed steroids on the set of “No Holds Barred”.
 Government: Did you learn if steroids were new to Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: He knew what they were.
 Government: Ever discuss steroids with Jay Strongbow?
 Terry B: Yes. Talked about Zahorian and getting steroids for his son.
 Government: Did you ever get steroids from Vince McMahon or Emily Feinberg?
 Terry B: I called Emily Feinberg on the road and told her to place an order for me.
 Government: How many times?
 Terry B: 10 or less times.
 Government: How would you get steroids through Emily Feinberg?
 Terry B: Go by the office and pick them up.
 Government: Who paid for the steroids from Emily Feinberg?
 Terry B: Most of the time I wrote a check or used cash. There were times that I picked up steroids that were not paid for because I gave steroids to Vince McMahon, so they were payback.
 Government: How common was it for you to use steroids?
 Terry B: Very common. Wrestlers used them. I had a prescription.
 Government: Who did you learn through that Zahorian was in trouble?
 Terry B: Pat Patterson said Zahorian was under investigation, don’t use or call him.
 Government: Did Patterson tell you not to use steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: What did Vince McMahon say?
 Terry B: Don’t use or call him.
 Government: Do you see this document? Is this your signature?
 Terry B: No.
A sidebar is called. After the sidebar the judge tells us that juror who looks like Flip Wilson has to give his keys to
 a court officer because his wife locked herself out of the house. The whole courtroom starts laughing. I noticed Hulk Hogan never changed from his solemn expression.
Government: Did you carry steroids on the road?
 Terry B: Yes
 Government: Why did you use steroids?
 Terry B: To heal injuries, to keep on going, the schedule was tough. It gave an edge. For bodybuilding. When I first started it was to get big and gain weight.
 Government: Ever wrestle in Nassau Coliseum?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: The statements that you made to the press about steroids were truthful?
 Terry B: No.
The female defense lawyer starts asking questions.
Defense: We’ve never met before Mr. Bolea?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Never spoken?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: For a period of time while you were in the WWF you did not wrestle at the Meadowlands.
 Terry B: Don’t know.
 Defense: Does this refresh your memory?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: You stopped steroids in 89?
 Terry B: Around then, maybe a little bit after.
 Defense: You and your wife have two children?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: July 27, 1990 is the date of birth of your last child?
 Terry B: Yes
 Defense: Did you and your wife, in 1989, decide you would not be on any drugs?
 Terry B: I would wind down and come off.
 Defense: Did you use steroids after October 1989?
 Terry B: Yes. We had an argument about her getting pregnant while I’m on drugs.
Defense reads GJ testimony of Hulk Hogan.
Defense:When was the last time you used steroids?
 Terry B: About 4 to 4 and a half years ago. It was 9 months before our daughter was born.
 Defense: You had steroids delivered to the homes of other people in the names of other people?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Dave Brower?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Was it practice that after a WrestleMania there would be a hiatus?
 Terry B: Sometimes.
 Defense: You try spending as much time with your family when you are not on the road?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You and your wife moved to Florida after July 1988?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: After WrestleMania 5, do you remember being in Florida for a period of time.
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: TCA would make travel arrangements for you by charter?
 Terry B: Yes or I would call myself.
 Defense: Always arranged by Titan?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you remember the issue of Titan paying for the charters?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Do you recall this letter April 11, 1989 where it talks about the issue of who would pay for a charter from Michigan to Tampa?
 Terry B: I don’t recall it.
 Defense: Did you live in Florida at this time at this address?
 Terry B: Don’t know.
 Defense: You owned it?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Was your mail forwarded from there to CT?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you recall picking up a package at Titan in April 89.
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Do you remember Jim Stewart delivering steroids from
 Titan to you at an arena?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Any orders placed to Zahorian by you were for your personal use?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Would you distribute steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Which you believed steroids were legal?
 Terry B: Yes because I had a prescription.
 Defense: Do you remember Dr. War from Canada, Dr. Pannovich from Denver, Dr. Liebowitz from NY?
 Terry B: Yes, except for Dr. Pannovich.
 Defense: Had other doctors dispensed steroids to you between 85 and 89?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: War?
 Terry B: Yes
 Defense: Liebowitz?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Pannovich?
 Terry B: Don’t remember.
 Defense reads Terry B’s Grand Jury statements which said that all four doctors including Zahorian wrote him prescriptions.
 Defense: Did you get deca from Ponnavich?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you try and use steroids legally?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you get a doctor to see you beforehand?
 Terry B: Not so much that, just made sure that I had a prescription.
 Defense: Did you get steroids in gyms in the 70s?
 Terry B: Yes, 70s and 80s.
 Defense: Once you started wrestling for large organizations like the AWA and Japan you starting seeing doctors for steroids?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: It was better to get from a doctor because of the quality?
 Terry B: Yes a concern in the gyms would be that they might be fake.
 Defense: Today in 1994 you have more knowledge of steroids than in the 80s?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: If you had this info back then would you not have used them?
 Terry B: That might have been the case.
 Defense: Were steroids common for athletes in other professions?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did Titan give you your own locker room?
 Terry B: Yes
 Defense: At Hershey?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You preferred to be with the people you wanted other than the extras?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Before you performed, you liked to be in private?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you remember the photo of you, Vince McMahon, and Zahorian shown at Zahorian’s trial?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you remember when it was taken?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: It was common to have photo taken with scores of people?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you have any knowledge of being in a room with Zahorian and Vince McMahon while discussing steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Vince McMahon never directed you to take steroids?
 Terry B: Never.
 Defense: It was your choice and decision?
 Terry B: Definitely.
 Defense: Other wrestlers take steroids?
 Terry B: To my knowledge, yes.
 Defense: Ever hear Vince McMahon tell a wrestler he should take steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Do you recall any conversations with Vince McMahon where he implied a wrestler should take steroids?
 Terry B: Never.
 Defense: Were advances for performances given out by agents at every performance?
 Terry B: Yes. It was deducted from their payment.
 Defense: Ever hear at any WWF event any agent say, “the doctor’s here, anyone want an advance?”
 Terry B: No. Just “does anyone want an advance”.
 Defense: The other wrestlers, not you, had to pay for their hotel rooms and meals?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: It was one town to another, night after night?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: 30 days at a time or more?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: The reason for an advance was so wrestlers could pay for expenses?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Ever heard of riggs?
 Terry B: Yes
 Defense: Is riggs slang for hyperdermic needles?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: It is not known commonly as steroids and needles?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: So riggs are not steroids.
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Ever heard of a roid rage?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: In your 12 or 13 years of use did you ever experience a roid rage?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Ever see Vince McMahon have a personality change known as roid rage?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Is it fair to say wrestlers are aggressive?
 Terry B: When performing.
 Defense: Being on the road, when the wrestlers were offstage were they boisterous?
 Terry B: Not all.
 Defense: Did some party?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did they get into trouble?
 Terry B: Sometimes.
 Defense: Did you ever the make the connection of steroids usage and the wrestlers being boisterous at a hotel or bar?
 Terry B: Never.
 Defense: Vince McMahon wanted the wrestlers to be in good physical shape?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: He acts upon those words himself?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Have you worked out with Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did he try to work out as hard as you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Ever heard the term bigger than life at WWF?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: What did you take it to mean?
 Terry B: Reference about me and how success had taken us by surprise and it was larger than life.
 Defense: Reference that the character was bigger than life?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Was it code word to take steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: To create public appeal you need a character?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You view yourself with 2 identities, Hulk Hogan and Terry Bolea?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Is Hulk Hogan bigger than life?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Was it the goal of Vince McMahon to promote a character that was larger than life to go over with the
 public?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Go over means public will accept as popular?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Ever have any personal knowledge that Titan paid for any steroids for wrestlers?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: As far as you know, in the locker rooms, they used their own money?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Ever see a road agent or any employee of Titan distribute steroids to a wrestler who wanted them?
 Terry B: Never.
 Defense: During 85–89, if you could not get steroids, you get from other physicians?
 Terry B: If needed, yes.
 Defense: Titan had nothing to do with Zahorian giving you steroids?
 Terry B: Nothing.
 Defense: Dave Brower was friend of yours from High School who lived in Florida?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you renew your friendship with him in 88 before the filming of No Holds Barred?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you train with him then?
 Terry B: Don’t recall.
 Defense: Did you call Zahorian and have him deliver steroids to Brower?
 Terry B: I don’t remember the dates. I put Dave Brower on the phone with Zahorian and introduced him because he was using steroids.
Defense reads Grand Jury statements.
Defense: Zahorian sent you Federal Express in Tampa.
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: To Dave Brower who received them for you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did Dave Brower and you share steroids?
 Terry B: Yes. Gave me my portion.
 Defense: You paid for steroids that you used from Dave Brower?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You made the order and for convenience you had it delivered to Dave Brower and you took some for your personal use?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you charge Dave Brower money?
 Terry B: No. He gave me 10 vials, so I gave him ten vials. We were friends. It is similar to how smokers share cigarettes.
 Defense: Between 85–91, you gave wrestlers steroids and the reverse was true. In your mind were you distributing steroids?
 Terry B: No, these were my friends.
 Defense: When they gave them to you, were they in your mind distributing steroids?
 Terry B: No. they were my friends.
 Defense: Did you believe as a lay person, that between 85 and 91, as long as a doctor prescribed them, they were legal?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you believe Zahorian was committing a crime?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: You did not have knowledge that it was criminal?
 Terry B: No, I did not.
 Defense: Did the other doctors write you a prescription?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you believe that Titan was condoning an illegal practice?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: When you were examined in Hershey, it was in private?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you talk to Zahorian about your physical condition?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you [talk] about problems apart from steroid usage?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you have personal and medical conversations with Zahorian?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you expect them to be confidential?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did some concern your wife?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You used Zahorian for reasons unassociated with steroids?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Were you satisfied with the advice of Zahorian?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: He helped you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You had close friends in the WWF?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Ed Leslie known as Beefcake?
 Terry B: yes.
 Defense: Brian Blair?
 Terry B: yes.
 Defense: John Minton, know as Big John Studd?
 Terry B: Yes, but I don’t see him as often.
 Defense: Do you recall Vince McMahon handing you steroids via
 Federal Express from Zahorian?
 Terry B: Never.
 Defense: In 1988 you received a Federal Express from Zahorian?
 Terry B: Yes.
We get 15-minute recess. A spectator in front row comments to someone that only people in the wrestling business that are
 rooting for the destruction of Titan and Vince are the higher ups in rival organizations. Like Eric Bischoff in WCW. Reason
 being he can lower salaries if Titan was gone because there wouldn’t be the threat of a wrestler leaving WCW to go to
 Titan and get a higher salary.
Defense: The packages were picked up because you knew steroids were ordered for you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Would you call from the road and ask Emily to order for you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did Vince McMahon ever direct her to order and supply you with steroids?
 Terry B: No, I called myself.
 Defense: Who would you pick up the package from?
 Terry B: Emily.
 Defense: Do you recall Vince McMahon ever dividing up steroids and handing you bottles and packages?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Did Jim Stewart ever deliver a package to you?
 Terry B: I don’t remember him doing that.
 Defense: Did you ever give Emily Feinberg instruction to give steroids to Jim Stewart?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: The steroids were paid for by you?
 Terry B: I would write a check for Zahorian.
 Defense: When you got steroids from others, you would not pay money and instead just give them some of your vials in return later?
 Terry B: Yes. No money.
 Defense: Orders were placed jointly for you and Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You knew Vince McMahon used steroids?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: From 84 and on, Vince McMahon was your friend?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You called him your brother?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You had respect for him?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you in 1993 call him “my hero”?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Vince McMahon respected you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Your ability and what you did for the WWF?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: The film “No Holds Barred” was produced by Shane productions which was owned by Vince McMahon correct?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You were involved exclusively in the filming, there were no performances then?
 Terry B: None that I can recall.
 Defense: During June and July of the production, he was in your company and involved in the production of the film?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You two stayed in the same hotel and trailer?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you know how old Vince McMahon is?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Is he in the present in his late 40's?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Back then he was in his early 40's?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: In your case you started using steroids when you were around 23–24?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Would it be unusual for an individual to start steroids in his early 40's?
Sidebar called.
Defense: Vince McMahon started using steroids in 88 while filming “No Holds Barred”?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did he use the steroids that you had?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Decadorabilin and oral pill called anabar?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you talk to Vince McMahon about cycling?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you show Vince McMahon how to inject himself with deca?
 Terry B: I don’t remember that.
 Defense: But you gave part of your supply to Vince McMahon for use and bottles were then given back to you by Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: It’s possible.
 Defense: Did Zahorian tell which steroids were the best to take?
 Terry B: Told me the safest. Anabar and deca were the safest.
 Defense: Did he characterize deca as being as safe as sugar passing through your system?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You talked to Vince McMahon about which were the safest?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you believe steroids helped you to heal from injuries that you sustained?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you feel steroids speeded the recovery from injury?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you talk to Vince McMahon about that?
 Terry B: I can’t recall.
 Defense: Were you surprised by the Zahorian investigation?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You were told not to call or talk to Zahorian?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you try?
 Terry B: Yes, at his office. He said he wouldn’t talk.
 Defense: Did you have any intent to obstruct a government investigation.
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: You called him as a friend?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you intend to defraud the FDA?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Did Vince McMahon or Titan tell you to call Zahorian?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: At the time of the Zahorian trial you were feeling a lot of pressure?
 Terry B: Yes. I felt at the time of the investigation that I was being singled out. The public didn’t know much about
 steroids. I felt that it was unfair that out of the thousands I was being singled out.
 Defense: Did you feel badgered?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: To this day does the question of steroids come up in every single interview?
 Terry B: About 85%.
 Defense: Before and after the Zahorian trial you gave untrue statements to the press?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: In particular the Arsenio Hall show?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Is it fair to say that you did not give the complete story on the Arsenio Hall show?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: What did Vince McMahon advise you about that?
 Terry B: He didn’t think it would be a good idea to go on the show because it was not the right format.
 Defense: What did he say about seeing the Grand Jury?
 Terry B: Tell them the truth.
 Defense: When you gave untrue statements to the media was it to defraud any agencies or obstruct any investigations?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: You felt the use of steroids was personal?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Bad publicity for you?
 Terry B: It turned out that way.
 Defense: Did you receive immunity?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Do you feel you committed a crime in regards to steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: At the time of the Grand Jury, were you involved with a promotion for the film “Mr. Nanny”?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Was there talk of “Thunder in Paradise” occurring?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Did you talk to Vince McMahon about a comeback to wrestling?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: In order to get money and exposure for your TV show?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Fair to see that Vince McMahon helped you start a new career?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You are currently under contract with the rival WCW?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You signed a contract with Ted Turner?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Is he the owner?
 Terry B: I don’t know who the owner is.
 Defense: You signed a contract to wrestle with Ric Flair?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You will be performing this Sunday on PPV.
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Still friends with Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: In 89 you made your home in Stamford, CT?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: You lived there from time to time?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Is it true that you do not recall all the days that you got steroids from Emily Feinberg?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: You met Dr. Liebowitz through Titan?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: You received steroids from Vince McMahon and Emily Feinberg who are not doctors?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: When you took the photo did you know them well?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: Is part of the appeal of Hulk Hogan his physical size?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: His 22-inch arms?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: In part Hulk Hogan got to be Hulk Hogan through steroids?
 Terry B: In part.
 Government: Every time Zahorian gave you steroids, he did not write a new prescription?
 Terry B: No. He just gave a note and said keep it in your bag.
 Judge: What were they?
 Terry B: Different sheets of paper for each steroid. It said deca for TB for bodybuilding.
 Government: He did not limit you?
 Terry B: Correct.
 Government: With your family doctor in Tampa do you tell him what drugs you want and he gets them for you?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: Does your family doc give you cash and carry treatment?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: Was Emily Feinberg Vince McMahon’s right-hand man?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: You gave steroids to Vince McMahon?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: When he used them, did he have an injury that needed to be healed?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: He wanted to bodybuild?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Government: When you called Zahorian did you tell him to call you back on a pay phone?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: Did you tell Zahorian to destroy any documents?
 Terry B: No.
 Government: Was Vince McMahon in the office when you received your steroids?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: These 2 pieces of paper are they similar to your prescriptions?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: One is for valium for muscle pain from Zahorian on July 1 85?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: You had one that said what?
 Terry B: Said deca and how many grams and it was for bodybuilding.
 Defense: Did you get a direction from Vince McMahon to carry that?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Neither Titan nor Vince McMahon provided you with the service of Liebowitz to get steroids?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: You do not take steroids anymore?
 Terry B: No.
 Defense: Do you still refer to your arms as pythons when in character?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: As 22 inches?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Are they still 22 inches?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: Is one of your lines for the Ric Flair PPV (said in a Hulk Hogan voice) what you gonna do Ric Flair when these pythons come after you?
 Terry B: Yes.
 Defense: And that’s without steroids?
 Terry B: Yes.


 ​
 If Vince McMahon had gone to jail for up to 12 months, I believe the WWF would have pretty much looked the same on-screen. The WWF were already taking steps to change their product, such as parting ways with Hulk Hogan (and later the British Bulldog and Ultimate Warrior), going with Bret Hart as the face of the company (Randy Savage was the transitional face) and implementation of a new drug testing policy. Had Vince McMahon not been acquitted on July 22, 1994, the changes between what actually occurred between July 1994 to July 1995, would have been minimal, with the main victim most likely to be have been Kevin Nash. Back in 1995 the WWF was running on Diesel Power and the engine was seizing. On the surface, Kevin Nash had to exact look that Vince McMahon wanted, but at the Box Office, he ended up being a complete failure. Until JBL came along in 2004, Big Daddy Cool had the distinction of being the worst drawing Champion in company history. While his matches with Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels were good, his clashes with Sid, Mabel, and Davey Boy Smith left something to be desired. Nash would lose the WWF title to Bret Hart at the Survivor Series in November and Bret would have an excellent title defense against the British Bulldog in December to close out the year. Had Vince McMahon not been around, I doubt his temporary board of bookers would have taken a gamble on Kevin Nash. As minimal as that one change sounds, not putting Nash in the top spot could have actually changed many things that were to later occur in the future. Without giving Nash the ball, the Kliq were unlikely to gain as much power as they did in the locker room. The WWF would have played it safe and stuck with Bret “Hitman” Hart as their top guy until McMahon returned. In addition to that, with Nash not getting the WWF Title, his value to WCW would have been significantly less, come the expiration of his WWF contract in May 1996. WCW would have been unlikely to offer 2 Intercontinental Title-level performers guaranteed multi-year million dollar contracts. This would have lead to a very different NWO, and possibly no NWO whatsoever, which would have greatly changed the Monday Night Wars. One could argue it would have been better if McMahon had gone to jail, as his decision to push Kevin Nash did nothing for his own business. However, by going to WCW as a WWF created main event star, Kevin Nash got himself a huge guaranteed contract, and Nash and his WCW/NWO counterparts dominated WWF in the ratings-war and almost put the WWF out of business. The success of WCW backed WWF into a corner, which inspired them to come out fighting. The WWF responded by creating the “attitude era” which resulted in the biggest boom period in company history. As bad as things looked in 1996 and 1997, the “attitude era” did a lot more for the WWF and wrestling, than staying narrowly ahead of a WCW Nitro show without the NWO, while being run by Jarrett and Patterson.


Originally published at The Steel Cage.

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