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“Revista Nacional de Arquitectura”, № 126, 1952

The concept of transparency is no stranger to graphic and industrial designers. In graphic design it can probably be traced back ​​to Beatrice Warde’s The Crystal Goblet in the early 20th century, or the “neutrality” of typographic layout as medium of information heralded by a host of mid-century modernist masters. In industrial design, this concept enjoys even wider popularity. Since Adolf Loos’s publication of Ornament and Crime, the quest for transparency seems to have only enjoyed increasing traction before culminating in the form-follows-function doctrine at HfG Ulm. To paraphrase a review from the design blog Hi-ID, an object’s transparency in industrial design is achieved by a unity between how it’s made and how it’s perceived. …


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Chinese type designer Xu Xuecheng. (Photo: Li Zhiqian)

Mr. Xu Xuecheng 徐学成, one of the first-generation type designers after the founding of the People’s Republic of China, passed away on November 1, 2019, at the age of 91.

Xu was born in 1928. After working as a book designer for several years at publishing houses, he was transferred to the type design lab at the state-owned Shanghai Printing Technology Research Institute (上海印刷技术研究所) in 1960.


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https://thetype.com/shop/collection

Update: this volume has been updated to a bilingual (English & Chinese) version and is now published. Please refer to the latest information here: https://thetype.com/shop/collection

We at The Type have been promoting public awareness of typography and design in the Chinese community for over ten years. Whether it is introducing Western typography theories and knowledge, or conducting independent research on Chinese typography in recent years, we are often concerned about the inadequate typography education in China as well as the lack of exchange we have with the international community. …

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The Type

Typography, design, society. https://thetype.com

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