Zero Eight: Why you should support those who are winning.

It’s simple when you think about it…


Picture the scene. It’s an overcast Friday afternoon in May here in the UK. Traffic is starting to get heavy and the warm spring air lets me know that summer isn’t too far away. I’ve just come from a work work meeting and I’m sat here in KFC munching away (it’s all about the Fillet Tower burger, mate. Get to know!) just casually watching the world go by with a blank canvas in front of me. This got me thinking. We all love to root for the underdog. It’s in our nature. We want the non-league team to cause an upset against a Premier League club in the FA Cup. Of course we do. Sometimes though, in whatever industry you’re in, backing the winner can in turn help you.

Let me explain.

My accent, not something which you’d typically hear in my native north-east, has always been an issue for other local artists. I wasn’t born here but that didn’t seem to stop the tirades of abuse for not sounding “local”. Not only that, but I’ve never sat on the fence with my music. When you’re in the business of creating, you want people to have a (strong) opinion either way. In my opinion, provoking a reaction means that you’ve done your job. Too many fence sitters tells me that you’ve played it safe, and who’s going to remember you in years to come for that? I’ve come to realise over the years that doing something bold, doing something out of your comfort zone and ultimately doing something different is what will set you apart (remember my sign?). I think it’s also a great opportunity to roll out a phrase which I heard during the recent Joshua VS Klitschko build up; “with great risk comes great reward” and I have to say that this is true of basically anything you do. If you’ve got the bottle to stand up and be counted, to go against the grain and stand alone with your own thoughts and ideas (irrespective of what everyone else says or does), the rewards could be huge.

As a side note; at first, they’ll mock. Then they see what you’re doing is working, then they copy. Sound familiar? History is littered with examples.

So what has this got to do with backing the winners exactly?

Well, where I am in the world, there’s a lot of negativity towards people who want to upset the apple cart and I hasten to add (as I’m sure you’ll be aware) that with success comes hate and jealousy. This song immediately comes to mind. This is where it gets interesting. Being jealous is a totally outdated way of thinking. It’s a reaction which suggests that you’re not comfortable within yourself and one which tells me that you probably doubt your own ability.

“…with great risk comes great reward.”

As mentioned on my Snapchat this week, backing those who are successful makes a lot of sense. When it comes to music specifically, when one door opens for an artist or band, it opens the door for everyone with a similar style or sound. I still read and hear…

“how come they’re getting attention and I’m not?”

1) If you’re working hard, making great music and you’re putting yourself out there, you must have faith that your time will come, and 2) by contacting people who have shown support to others in your field, how can this be a bad thing for you? You could be next in line and jumping on such an opportunity could be the break you’ve been looking for. Mate. Seriously. Get on it.

If your glass is half full, you’ll have that predatory instinct and you’ll try to capitalise on what’s going on around you. With your glass half empty, you’ll sulk and whinge that these great things aren’t happening to you and this amazing opportunity which is staring you in the face will pass before your eyes.

In conclusion, what I’m saying is support the winners because not only will doors open for them, but in turn, they’ll open for you.

Positive vibes only. Please. Thanks.

[ #PTFAD ]

Let me know your thoughts on this blog post. You can find me across the internet via my website (or search for me by typing: thisisABSORB into your favourite social media platform).

photo by Idene Roozbayani
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