You may or may not have heard of this statistic from Google:

53% of mobile site visits leave a page that takes longer than three seconds to load
https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/marketing-resources/data-measurement/mobile-page-speed-new-industry-benchmarks/

With that in mind, it’s important to make our site as responsive and quick as possible.

We recently rewrote one of our APIs from scratch, Saved Items, to better pave the way for new functionality and improve the performance by utilising new technologies such as .NET Core 2.

Fast forward to the end of the development

The API has been rewritten. Functionally it’s performing as expected — we’ve got acceptance, integration, performance tests in place. …


Tests slow? Flaky? Hard to understand?

I’m Tom, a QA Engineer in the ASOS Tech team, and if you’re familiar with any of the issues above, then I encourage you to read on.

I joined ASOS Tech last year, entering the Saved Items API team. If you shop with ASOS, we’re the team that deals with managing, storing and providing the data for the products that people ‘save’ to come back to later.

Saved Items was already established when I joined and had a solution in place for its development and testing. This consisted of a regression pack of acceptance…


.NET Core 2.2 health checks are introduced right out of the box and with minimal work required in order to get them up and running.

If you don’t already have health checks, it’s something to strongly consider. Knowing whether your application is healthy or not can minimise risk by reducing downtime as well as investigation time, and it can alert you when services go down.

If you do have health checks that you’ve implemented yourself, switching to the native .NET Core implementation will be a breeze.

Nuget packages

You’ll want to install the following nuget package before we begin:

Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Diagnostics.HealthChecks

Our previous health checks

Previously…

Tom Longhurst

Quality Assurance Engineer at ASOS

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