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While Valentine’s Day is a holiday for all of those in love, I picture Valentine’s Day like this: A young couple walks across a wooden bridge. They hold hands, laugh at each other’s jokes, and steal momentary glances. Shortly afterward they have a wonderful dinner at a glorious restaurant and then…the server brings the bill.

And, just like that, the first relationship decisions begin to occur about money. Do they split the check? Does one person pay for all of it? There are many people out there with a strong opinion about what should happen next.

As a financial expert who has counseled many individuals and couples through financial decisions, I would like to share financial tips to consider for your relationship. …


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Here we are about to wrap up another calendar year, and another decade comes to a close. As you get ready to enter the 2020’s ahead, take stock of these ten year-end financial tips to help you put a bow on 2019.

Number 1: Reflect on your financial goals for this past year. Did you reach your goals? How much have you grown?

Any time we want to make a change, a good first step is to stop and take a realistic look at where you already are. Take a moment to write down all of your accounts and what they are currently worth. If you did this last year, you can compare last year’s answer to the reflection questions above. …


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Trust. It’s everything. It’s the key to success when you first begin a relationship. It’s the key to maintaining a relationship with your clients. How do you build trust? How do you build it quickly? People who figure it out are often times far more successful in the financial services industry that those who continue to struggle with it over the years. So, how have we built trust?

Well, going back to no one cares what you know until they know that you care. It’s a really helpful insight for you to understand how you can initially build trust. People like you better when you’re interested in them, not interesting. Be interested, not interesting. Ask them about themselves to learn more about them. You’d be amazed. Some of the most trusting relationships will develop where you’ve spent 30 seconds talking and they’ve spent 9 1/2 minutes talking because you listened. …

About

Timothy Clairmont

Tim Clairmont, CFP®, MSFS, is an author, speaker, and founder and CEO of Clear Financial Partners, Inc., a financial planning firm.