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On August 4th, four cities in Indiana filed lawsuits against streaming companies like Netflix, Disney, DirecTV, Dish Network, and Hulu. These cities claim that these companies should be paying the same fees that cable companies pay for using local rights of way. This law was established under the Video Service Franchises (VSF) Act and requires a percentage of gross revenue to be paid out to each city that a cable company operates in.

This is a very strange lawsuit and doesn’t seem likely to succeed. Cities are claiming that streaming services like Netflix are using the public rights of way by providing their services over the internet. The cables which connect homes to the internet are placed on public rights of way (underneath roads, for example) and thus streaming companies fall under the same category as any other cable company. …


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It’s very common to require some setup when a component is mounted to perform tasks like network calls. Before hooks were introduced we were taught to use functions like componentDidMount(). It is natural to look for equivalent hooks when transitioning to functional components.

TL;DR, hooks and lifecycle methods are based on very different principles. Methods like componentDidMount() revolve around lifecycles and render time whilst hooks are designed around state and synchronization with the DOM.

A lot of programmers assume that they can replace the behavior of componentDidMount() with useEffect(fn, []). While there don’t seem to be any major errors when using this approach, it can still lead to some app-breaking bugs. Both methods are fundamentally different, and you might not get the expected behavior you want. Programmers are not supposed to think of hooks as functions that run when a component mounts. …


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A couple of days ago, the city of Las Vegas gave Elon Musk’s Boring Company the green light to begin the expansion of their underground highway system called “The Loop.” Musk and his team have ambitious plans for The Loop. Not only does Musk see it as the future of urban commuting, but he also believes that it will serve as the stepping stone for his other project, Hyperloop.

How does this loop work?

Despite being called “The Loop,” it isn’t a physical loop. The tunnels aren’t shaped in some large ring following the contour of urban centers. Instead, The Loop is a series of tunnels that run all over a city. Usually, it means having a primary route that connects dense urban areas with smaller routes pointing towards less populated neighborhoods. …


A major new version without adding new features?

It has been two and a half years since React v16 was first released. The dev team promises that update v17 is incredibly important for the future of React but claims that no new features are being added. So what exactly does that mean? And how can React claim to be releasing a major new version without adding new features?

Past React updates have always caused deprecations of older versions. This could make it incredibly difficult for teams to upgrade their React versions, especially when working with large or neglected codebases. So, the React team has decided that v17 will lay the groundwork for a new method of adopting updates. When React v18 is released, developers will be able to choose to only upgrade parts of their app and keep other parts running on v17. React advises against this if you’re application is actively maintained or in large-scale production, but it can help teams who don’t actively maintain their application or who don’t need to migrate certain components to the newer version. …


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Microsoft has one of the largest C/C++ codebases in the world. All of its core products from Windows and Office to the Azure cloud run on it. Unsurprisingly, since C++ is not a memory-safe language, a lot of memory bugs popup in their codebase, and a lot of time has to be spent fixing them. Last year, Microsoft began looking at alternative programming languages that could help fix their memory safety issues. As a result of these pursuits, Microsoft has begun experimenting, and in some cases integrating, Rust into their codebase. Rust is a relatively new programming language that promises the same low-level performance of C and C++ with a feature set expected from a modern programming language. …


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Marcus Cicero, a Roman lawyer famous for his rhetoric and persuasive arguments

For the past couple of months, I have seen one phrase consistently show up in my social media feeds.

If you disagree with me, unfollow me

While there may not seem anything wrong with this phrase, I worry that my generation is more and more losing the ability to hold an argument. Instead of attempting to persuade someone of why you believe you are correct, it has become easier to tell the opposition they’re wrong. We are losing our understanding of how the English language truly works because of this. Post by post, our language is reduced into a series of hashtags, emojis, acronyms, and broken chains of ideas. Our society uses arguments that consist of demonizing opponents to attract people to their side. …


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Front-end frameworks have provided developers with a much easier way to write applications with complicated states. Each framework provides their own solution for managing state as well as how to update the DOM. For example in React, you have to explicitly declare when you want to update the state either with a this.useState call or a hook.

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An example React component which updates state with a hook

It’s usually pretty easy to understand how a framework operates behind the scenes. Vue, React, and Angular all require you to create either a class or some function which the framework has control over. You must declare their state variables as either properties of the class or with hooks. …


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Rust is a modern programming language focused around memory safety and performance. There is no virtual machine, garbage collection, or other fluff which you will find in higher-level languages. Rust primarily aims to solve a lot of the issues which C/C++ programmers face frequently. I have been using Rust for the past couple of months and believe that it is a language that everyone should learn. Here are a couple of reasons why.

Rust is one of the few languages to come with a built-in package manager (it’s called Cargo). Working with Cargo is an absolute pleasure compared to some other package managers. …


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https://pineco.de/using-turbolinks-with-vue/

Single Page Applications, or SPAs, have become increasingly popular in 2020 to make websites appear faster. They work by rewriting the content of a web page with downloaded data, instead of making the browser download entire new pages.

There are many benefits to using a SPA. Most notably, the website feels faster when navigating within it. When the web view doesn’t have to refresh the transition between pages feels a lot smoother. We can also leverage this technology to create animations between the separate pages.

I really wanted to use this technology when rewriting my portfolio. However, I host the website on Github Pages — which is a static site hosting service — and thus cannot use a framework like React or Angular. There are ways to fix this problem, but I found that I wouldn’t leverage the power of React or Angular, and decided to look for a more “vanilla” approach. …

About

Tino Caer

Student at the Grainger School of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Learn more at tinocaer.com

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