Angels & Spartans

Why All Investors and Entrepreneurs Need To Do This…

Every serious angel investor and startup founder needs to be in the San Fran stadium on July 18th, 2015.

Those that show up will experience an event that could dramatically alter their startup, and startup investing performance. For the better.

Disclaimer: If you didn’t find the 300 movie inspiring; stop reading this, put all your money in a junior bank savings account, get a day job, and never leave it.

If you aspire to something more, this is for you!

#ChallengeAccepted

On July 18th, 2015 the AT&T Park stadium in San Francisco will be hosting the @SpartanRace.

This Spartan Sprint is an adventure race, over 3 miles long, with 15+ obstacles that will separate the real entrepreneurs from the dreamers. And will help angel investors and entrepreneurs seeking co-founders identify the types of people they should want in their circles.

4 Reasons to Run with the Spartans

1. The Number One Key to Success in a Startup is Endurance

You can have the best product idea in the world. You can have the best developers on the planet. You can love what you are making. You can have all the funding in the valley. But if you don’t have endurance your startup isn’t going to make it. If you are going to be the greatest boxer in the world, the best social network on the web, the charity that really has an impact at scale, or the healthcare startup that actually changes the system for the better — you’ve got to be able to take a few punches, and keep on going. An adventure race like this is all about improving your endurance. It’s not about who is fastest, or first. It’s about who can stick it out till the finish.

2. Finding the Others

The Spartan Race was invented by an entrepreneur who wanted to create a way to separate those with great endurance and will power. Those that can drive themselves through these events prove that they can push themselves to new levels of mental toughness and performance. If those sound like people that would make great co-founders for your startup, or great founders to fund; it’s worth checking one of these events out.

3. Healthy Habits

You don’t have to push yourself through the challenging training it takes to be a Spartan to have a beach bod or to be in good health. But those that do will find they are creating good habits that keep them in top gear when it comes to productivity, and maximum cognitive capacity for innovative thinking.

4. Beating Fear of Failure

Shark Tank investor Barbara Corcoran repeatedly reminds us that you have to be willing to ‘fail’ in order to be successful. In fact; she tells Inc. that her “number one rule for building an innovative company is to accept that failure and build it into your budget.” When you attend a Spartan Race you never know what you are going to come up against. The founder behind these races Joe De Sena, has even created what’s known as the ‘Death Race’. All of them are designed to crush you, surprise you, and stretch you to your limits. You never know exactly how long the race will be, where the trail will lead, or what the obstacles will be. But you will come out on the other side; braver and unafraid to take on new challenges. You don’t have to be the first to finish. Or set time records. You just have to make it to the finish line. After this; nothing you have to confront via the screen on your Mac, or on the pitch stage is going to be daunting.

What if I’m Not in Silicon Valley?

The good news is that you don’t have to be anywhere near San Francisco, CA to get funded, find a startup to invest in, or take part in a Spartan Race!

Read: I’m Not in Silicon Valley: How Do I Raise Money

Find Spartan Races in hot startup cities all over the continent here

You can also just look to new crowdfunding platforms to have curated startup investment opportunities delivered to your mobile device, or to get introduced to real angel investors that are a good match for your venture. And you’ll never have to do another push up, crunch, or burpee, ever.

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