Finding Hidden Profit In Your Email Newsletter — Lesson Ten

Playing The Newsletter Game

This is part TEN of TWELVE lessons in the Finding Hidden Profit course on Skillshare. You will also find links to each of the 12 lessons in the video notes.

Please note: If you are NOT currently a Skillshare member, here is my link [I am an affiliate partner] for a free 30-day trial (more than enough to take the full FHP course and any of the other 15,000+ courses available) on Skillshare.com

Invitation To Play The Game

I am going to invite you to play the…

Game

Of

Online

Newsletters

Before this course existed (or was even planned) this idea has been rattling around in my head, so much that I wrote this blog post earlier this year.

There is something special that happens when people kick in their sense of play. We become resilient. The hard knocks don’t bother us as much. We become more creative.

Watch children play and there is an energy between them. When the energy ebbs, the kids go home and finish the day. But play-time brings out the best of us.

So my invitation is for you to join me in doing the same. Let’s make these newsletters our play space.

I don’t know about you, but I have done so many work projects over the years that felt like tedious work, that I am not sure it was worth it. I have nothing against hard work — it’s just when you add in the element of play, hard work becomes playing hard and it doesn’t feel like such a burden.

And the output of work that feels like play is also often the best you will ever find.

The Value Of Scoreboarding

Ever since my days coaching basketball (HS and small collegiate level) I have tried to apply the lesson of scoreboarding to everything I do.

In basketball, that meant that everything we did in practice, was a mini-game. And it changed the team culture immediately.

In business, management expert Peter Drucker said “What gets measured gets improved.”

Even the science is aligned on this point, as there are numerous studies like this one that show that when immediate feedback is available, the efforts and results reach higher levels.

When you can see the scoreboard — which means the time left in the game you are playing, and the score (feedback on how you are doing) you can muster great rallying efforts and the best stories of resilience we can imagine.

Fun + Feedback = Flow

Getting into the Flow state (or getting into The Zone) is about being tuned in, tapped in, and turned on to the full array of who you are as a person.

Scoreboarding in the path to finding Flow in the work/play that we do. It is not enough alone (you need to add the sense of play or fun to make the most out of the feedback).

What Numbers To Watch

In email marketing, there are a number of “metrics” that you could watch and monitor to see how you are doing:

  • Open rate = how many people see your email
  • Click-Through-Rate = how many clicks results from those readers
  • Earnings per click = a formula for dollars earned per each click
  • And more…

But I think there are three big numbers that I care about and would recommend you pay attention to, over all others.

Number of subscribers

Number of gold nuggets (or value bombs) delivered each week

Avg revenue per subscriber per month

If I were to design an ideal scoreboard, that is what I would want to see each morning when I started my day, because I would want to know that my audience is growing, that I am delivering content, and the dollars per subscriber per month is especially motivating to me.

If you knew for sure that each new subscriber was going to be worth $1 per month — wouldn’t you get really creative and figure out a way to get 10,000 of them. Because think about it — with 10,000 subscribers equaling $10,000 per month, you are pretty much in financial freedom to do what you want, when you want.

Join The Club

So I am going to ask you to join the club and start scoreboarding your efforts. As explained in the video, go to ListGoal.com and set up a free scoreboard to track your number of subscribers versus your next goal you are trying to reach.

You will need to sign up for an email service provider. I would recommend that if you have not chosen one yet, just use MailChimp because they let you add up to 2,000 subscribers for free to get started, and ListGoal works great with MailChimp. In the next lesson we will talk more about tools and resources.

One last thought: Did you notice what I did when I started this post?

I invited you to join me in becoming one of the GOONies!

I invited you to play the…

Game

Of

Online

Newsletters

Not everyone is going to be a Goonie. Not everyone wants to be one. But that is the thing about being part of a club. Knowing not everyone is going to be a member is what makes it special.

Goonies like playing the game.

They like doing something that is both fun and makes them money.

They like giving value first, and building the relationship bank account.

They treat their audience like family (and family like their audience, at least to get started).

And they know that they can earn a side income and more, just by connecting their people with information that they want to know about — no need to be salesy.

So what do you think? Want to play Goonies with me? 😉

Homework

Your homework for Lesson Ten is to, if you have not already done so — sign up for MailChimp (or one of the other ESPs) and a free account with ListGrow. Each time you open a new tab on your computer, you will see your audience and your goal. So let’s play the game…

This was part TEN of TWELVE lessons in the Finding Hidden Profit course on Skillshare. You will also find links to each of the 12 lessons in the video notes.

Please note: If you are not currently a Skillshare member, here is my link [I am an affiliate partner] for a free 30-day trial (more than enough to take the full Finding Hidden Profit course and any of the other 15,000+ courses available) on Skillshare.com

And if you would like to see an example of my own, personal-branded newsletter called [Tobin Today] you can subscribe here (sent each Thursday morning):

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