Finding Hidden Profit In Your Email Newsletter — Lesson Three

What Is A Curated Newsletter?

This is part THREE of TWELVE lessons in the Finding Hidden Profit course on Skillshare. You will also find links to each of the 12 lessons in the video notes.

Please note: If you are NOT currently a Skillshare member, here is my link [I am an affiliate partner] for a free 30-day trial (more than enough to take the full FHP course and any of the other 15,000+ courses available) on Skillshare.com

A Different Kind Of Newsletter

As explained in video lesson three, when most people hear the term newsletter, they tend to think of text-laden documents that are less exciting than a newspaper — because they often contain too much promotional and not enough to inform or entertain.

But curated emails are very different — and that difference is one worth paying attention to. I even wrote this post several months ago on the same subject.

For A Different Kind of Reader

With constant flow of information on the news, in our email, and on the web, many readers have learned the skill of being able to quickly scan for signals that there is something worth paying attention to.

Curated email newsletters are designed to work with and satisfy the attentio of readers who spend an average of 5 to 15 seconds on any one email before hitting delete and moving on to the next.

With a curated email, it is like getting a buffet of things to sample and you only have to click on the ones that pique your curiosity into wanting more.

You Are Already A Curator

Do you ever find yourself sharing really fun jokes with family members, or maybe hitting the share button on a specific topic because you know one friend who would really appreciate seeing the article?

That is curation. And it seems like everyone is doing it these days, in some shape or form.

It is very common behavior on social media (hence all the share buttons) but newsfeed of information is so full and flowing so fast with posts that people jokingly say it is like trying to get a drink of water from a fire hose.

The problem (and opportunity) however is that as people find little gold nuggets of content to share, most people never see it, unless it is shared directly in an email or chat message.

But curated email newsletters gather together a batch of those “nuggets” of interest, and puts them in front of an audience of readers who share a common interest AND who all opted in to receive the daily or weekly newsletter.

The Value of Curation

If you are reading this article, you have access to the internet. Which also means you live in an era of too much information — more than our brains can process.

The solution to this problem of information overload, is to focus in on a small number of sources that consistently, provide valuable information.

That is what a curator does. They show you where to focus your attention. And it is a skillset that is becoming increasingly valuable in our modern world.

It wasn’t long ago that people would say “content is king” and the ability to create content that people want to consume — unlocked the keys to the kingdom.

But today, with 300–400 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute, and millions of blog posts, you don’t need to be the content creator (which can be a lot of work, when done well) if you can serve up the best of the web for people who are ready to consume.

Different Ways To Curate Those Links

As you saw in the video (and from the examples in the Homework section below), curated emails can look very different.

Some curators write what looks like a personal letter to their audience of readers, and they hyperlink the words back to the topics they share — like this.

Other newsletters are more visual, and are built like lego blocks, with chunks of content being stacked in sets. You can see an example of a fun “takeover” newsletter I did for Star Wars Day (May the Fourth Be With You) that uses this more visual style.

Some newsletters choose to send daily, like Inside.com, The Hustle, and The Skimm. Others follow a weekly format. Multi-person media teams tend to deliver the former, while the latter tend to work better for one-person “solopreneurs.”

Where To Find All This Great Content…

In our next lesson, we will get into the process of finding great content related to your chosen topic and audience. Some days, you may find a whole batch just by reading the news about what is interesting to you.

But our Lesson Four will focus on tools to make the process easier to find AND save the kind of content you will be proud to share with your readers — the kind of good stuff that keeps them coming back for more.

But let’s not forget about your homework…

Homework

Your homework for Lesson Three is to sign up for at least one (several is even better) curated newsletters, so you can see first hand what the experience is like as a reader. To make things easier, I put together a collection of links to some of the best known and most popular newsletters on a range of topics.

This was part THREE of TWELVE lessons in the Finding Hidden Profit course on Skillshare. You will also find links to each of the 12 lessons in the video notes.

Please note: If you are not currently a Skillshare member, here is my link [I am an affiliate partner] for a free 30-day trial (more than enough to take the full Finding Hidden Profit course and any of the other 15,000+ courses available) on Skillshare.com

And if you would like to see an example of my own, personal-branded newsletter called [Tobin Today] you can subscribe here (sent each Thursday morning):

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