Listening and Learning

I have always struggled with writing. Throughout my childhood schooling writing was always my biggest weakness. The feedback from my teachers always complained that my essays always ended up being descriptions of whatever I was analyzing instead of actually analyzing it. It wasn’t until later that I began to realize that I believed listening and learning to be mutually exclusive with concluding and speaking. I’ve always prioritized observation — taking in as much information as my little brain could take. I think the world is amazingly and incredibly complex and us humans can barely keep up observing much less concluding anything truly significant about how the world works. When I interact with people I much rather listen and observe than make conclusions because I believe the same of people: complex and awesome. But as I’ve gotten older (and to me 25 seems pretty old), I’m starting to notice something: I’m forgetting things. I used to be able to take in information and store it all but now I’m finding out that as the world has steadily gotten bigger, I’m retaining less and less of what I’m seeing. The problems I face are getting exponentially more complicated and vague. The information I’m taking in are exceedingly more nuanced and n0n-deterministic.

This is all to say: I’m going to start blogging!

I think I used to think that people who publish their ideas (by pen or mouth) were people who were so in love with their great ideas that they felt the compulsion to let everyone in the world how brilliant their new idea is. But my new hypothesis is perhaps publishing is merely just a way to remember and record new learnings and listening for new ideas. Maybe publishing is more like echolocation than yodeling — radar rather than radio. I hope to make this blog a cauldron for amplifying my learnings and experiences. I actually think I lead a pretty interesting mundane life (like you won’t believe how exciting my extremely routine life is — I made tacos for dinner today!) and this is an experiment to make the most of what life gives me. Here’s to listening and learning!

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.