CSAT: From Zendesk to NiceReply

Disclosure: I’m a client of NiceReply

The mission

It goes without saying that as support professionals, we’re after whatever information can help us understand what improvements can be made to our service, product when, where, and how. After reading The Effortless Experience last year, I was hooked on implementing the Customer Effort Score into my well of data collections. As I plotted ways to incorporate a CES survey, I was faced with a bit of a harsh reality:

The problem

Back in May of 2016, we used Zendesk primarily for our CSAT responses. If you don’t use Zendesk currently, Zendesk offers an out-of-the-box email CSAT survey when you solve tickets (time depending on your settings). Bent to add CES to our repertoire, our current configuration was not going to make that easy:

  • CSAT survey dispatched via email to the customer after the ticket is solved.
  • NPS survey dispatched via email to the customer 14 days after their original order, or maybe 30 days, 60 days, 90 days assuming they haven’t gotten one within that window.
  • Transactional emails such as order information (shipping, delivered, etc) are dispatched to the customer’s email inbox

The intent on this entire endeavor was to learn and reduce the customer’s effort, but the potential of adding yet another transactional email is arguably doing the exact opposite.

If only there was a way for me to eliminate email in one of those facets, replace it with a Customer Effort Survey without losing any of those great data collectors.

The solution

That’s when I came across NiceReply, an all-in-one customer satisfaction survey tool that offers CSAT, CES, and NPS all in one system. Admittedly, the only thing I was primarily interested was their CES survey. The wheels turned, and this was my McGiver’d solution:

  • Eliminate Zendesk CSAT and replace it with NiceReply’s CSAT: Email surveys, amirite? Sure, the easiest to deploy, but the response rates are deplorable. We averaged 15%-17% response rate from email a week, which, while isn’t necessarily low, it’s not nearly as high as I’d prefer it to be. The solution within the solution: get rid of it. Instead, we replaced it with the in-signature method that NiceReply advocates for heavily as a better means of collecting more ratings (Fun Fact: I wasn’t initially sold on the idea that in-signature ratings would actually garner more responses. I thought of it as a nuisance more than anything else. Boy was I wrong).
  • New CSAT Sheriff in town: And it’s name was NiceReply. Replacing Zendesk’s CSAT with NiceReply, we saw a 20%-30% increase in CSAT response ratings per week. Pulling last week’s numbers, we had a CSAT response rate of 58% which is almost unheard of.
  • Capitalized on one less email: With Zendesk’s CSAT out, it made room for me to employ NiceReply’s CES survey system in the vacant email transactional opening.

The recap

Sometimes, to really get what we’re after, we’re required to develop skills of mad scientists; combining tools and practices to help us get to the ultimate goal. This was one of my experiments that we have been able to bring to life with no side effects.

Customer Effort Survey: dispatched at the conclusion (“solve”) of every ticket (10 hours after ticket close for us since our resolution time is around 8 hours), managed by NiceReply.

Customer Satisfaction Survey: imbedded in the agent’s signature, freely, without any external dispatching. Saw a 20%-30% increase in ratings.

We’ve been using this configuration for over a year now with nothing but glowing things to say about it. It’s provided more insight as more people are inclined to rate conversations, allowed us as a department/company to implement Customer Effort Surveys to understand where we were falling short, and it ultimately did so without costing the customer yet another transactional email. Win, win, win is what that’s referred to as in the mediation world.

Let me know if anyone has any questions on how to configure anything, or make transition! Always happy to help.

Antonio King
AKA Tones
Director of Experience
www.shinesty.com

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