Breaking down the numbers of the tourism industry: A space between customers and destinations.

For the majority of people around the world, traveling is…well, just that. Maybe is because when we travel we are just focused on having a good time, eating delicious food and getting to visit all those places we always dream about. However, traveling is much more than that. Let’s put it in numbers.

The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) is the global authority on travel and tourism. They published an annual report on the impact of the industry to the world economy. So, if you ever underestimated the importance of the tourism industry, please be ready to never do it again. According to the 2017 WTTC annual report, the direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the World in 2016 was USD 2,3 Billions which represents the 3,1% of total GDP. The 2016 total contribution was of USD 7,6 Billions, representing the 10,2% of total GDP. The total contribution to employment was of 292,220,000 jobs and is expecting to rise by 2,5% by 2027.

If global economy doesn’t fit you, let’s do it other way. Dominican Republic, this beautiful island in the Caribbean, with pristine waters, destiny of hundreds of cruises per year, you wouldn’t think about how important the tourism industry is for them. The true is they have a lot to be thankful to travellers. There, tourism represents for them 17,3% of their GPD, meaning that 17,3% of their economy is based on tourism. Same happens with the small island of Aruba, where the tourism represents 88,1% of their economy or in the Bahamas where is the 44,8%. And that’s only in the Caribbean.

At this point, if the problem are the numbers, you should think about all the people who work in hotels, or in the taxi driver who pick you at the airport and drive you to the Airbnb. What about the guy who owns a little boat and takes you to the sea for you to scuba dive, or that girl who guides you through a museum explaining everything you need to be explained. All those people, are affected by tourism and the value it added.

What’s in the middle?

Of course, in the middle of those people life and yours. The life of the customer who travels and gets his well-deserved vacation, there is an empty space for technology to do its part. We know technology is affecting all industries, including the travel and tourism business. However, there is still so much to do. In an article published by Forbes Magazine early in 2016, several CEO’s of companies such as Lufthansa, American Express and the Leading Hotels in the World, gave their views and insights on what should be the role of technology in the industry. They all coincided in one vital job to be done: To improve the experience of the customer by personalizing it.

That is why one of the aims and goals of TravelContact is precisely that, to generate value by personalizing the experience of the customer. How? by introducing a system that allows agencies to gather they data and analyse it to take the advantage and be more efficient. The process of choosing where to travel, how to travel, but more important, determining the way we travel is going to be changed. We’ve seen an increase in productivity tools that allow us to improve the way we work. Well, TravelContact is a clear example on how productivity must be, because It helps the travel planner sitting in his chair to do his job faster and easier. But also, TravelContact is addressing a bigger picture. They are solving two problems in one. They are helping the agencies and they are introducing a one-on-one approach to the customer.

The tourism industry has to be protected, sponsored, innovated. TravelContact is into that path. We’ve seen the numbers, there are up there, the industry is much more than packing some random shirts and a pair of socks in a bag and putting yourself in a plane sit. The industry is data, economy and companies, but more important the industry is people, jobs, life and experiences.

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