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I completely support any efforts I can to help veterans as I come from a large family of retired and active duty military. While at college in San Diego, I noticed a huge encampment near the campus on the edge of Balboa Park.

What I saw was something I had been advocating amongst peers, through elected officials, and by just taking the time to stop and listen. Homeless veterans. Heres a link to what I saw

It has pained me to see so many of them in a city that has such a strong and large military proud community. I try and interact with the ones who I could tell would enjoy someone to talk to. Some of them truly just want to be left alone and I can totally respect that.

I needed to do or see more action in helping these more than deserving men and women get the treatment and basic necessities that they earned beyond a doubt. I was so happy to see an organization like that rising up to fight for those who actually fought for us.

Unfortunately, my school and work schedule prevented me from volunteering, but I saved up for 6 months to donate all I could ($118). I had to eat even more top ramen and questionable 99¢ Store food, but that sacrifice compares nothing to theirs.

The whole millennial veteran aspect is true, but a bit skewed. Vietnam had a major draft. There hasn’t been any drafts during our millennial lifetimes, so that plays a huge part into why there are so many Vietnam vets. Being a millennial myself, I know dozens of us, personally, that have served or are active military.

Perhaps there are still less of us than there would be Vietnam vets if they never had the draft, I am not sure. Also, I do think there is a far more bleaker image of joining the military in our generation than ever before as well. I myself tried joining on two separate occasions and both times failed my physical to my lower body bone and tendon defects.

I even spent a year prepping the best I could while losing 60 lbs just to be accepted for bootcamp. I can only speak for myself and about 60 others in my age group (23–28) who love or would love to serve. There are still a good chunk millennials who truly respect and admire those serving in, those who served, and those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

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