A guide to keeping your readers engaged

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Image Courtesy of Scribe Media

People don’t have a lot of free time, and there’s more and more content competing for their attention than ever. Books are valuable, but they’re a big ask. They take hours to read. If your book can’t hook readers in the first few minutes, they’ll drop it and spend their time surfing social media or watching TV instead. It’s not enough for authors to find their target audience. They also have to keep the audience’s attention.

That’s where an author blog can be helpful. Every post is a chance to keep your audience engaged. Blogs offer bite-sized content that draws readers in. Once you’ve shown that you have valuable things to say, they’re much more likely to buy your book or use your professional services. …


A step-by-step guide to crafting a subtitle that sells

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Image Courtesy of Scribe Media

Does your book need a subtitle? Probably. A good book title hooks the reader and makes them interested.That buys you about two more seconds to either reel them closer or lose them completely with the subtitle.

The subtitle reels them in by explaining exactly why they should read the book. If you can do both things in the title, then you don’t need a subtitle. But that’s extremely rare.

Most of the time, the hook and the reel are two different pieces, split across the title and subtitle.

Take 3 examples

  • The Cilantro Diaries
  • The Patient as CEO
  • Never Lose a Customer Again

The first title could be almost anything. …


A step-by-step guide

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Image Courtesy of Scribe Media

When it comes to gaining visibility as an author, PR can be a powerful tool, but there is a right and a wrong way to get PR. Many authors believe that press releases are necessary to get media and PR after they write their book. This isn’t true. The idea that press releases are required is an artifact from a prior age of media. That being said, you can still use press releases to help you get PR, and in this piece, I’ll show you the most current best practices for book press releases.

In this post, you’ll find an explanation of what makes a good press release, information about how to write a press release, and examples of successful press releases. Plus, here’s a press release template that you can download and use to follow along. …


Everything you need to know about finding literary agents

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Image Courtesy of Scribe Media

The world of traditional publishing can be a mystery. Most of it happens behind closed doors, and the people who know how it really works hardly ever talk about it (at least not publicly).

That’s especially true when it comes to literary agents. So, before I explain how to find a literary agent, let me be clear:

I’ve written (or overseen the development of) dozens of book proposals that sold to traditional publishers, for advances that ranged from $150k to $2 million (many of them Scribe clients). …


Finding the right editor for your book is crucial

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Image Courtesy of Scribe Media

Everyone needs an editor.

If you want your book to do anything positive for you, it has to come across as professional — not just in the way it looks, but in the way it reads, and editors are critical to making that happen.

If the only editor you use is yourself, you’re a fool, and your book will suffer. But if you take the time to find and hire a good editor, your book will be much better for it.

There is a right and wrong way to approach editing your book, and this step-by-step guide walks you through the process of hiring a book editor: from identifying the kind of editing you need, to choosing the perfect editor for your book, I’ll cover it all. …


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As a general rule, I don’t write writing advice lists, and I dislike posts with “writing tips.” The problem is that young writers and Authors study those lists instead of the fundamentals. If you want to actually write and publish a book, there’s no substitute for executing the simple fundamentals of good writing.

But — that being said — there’s always a place for learning new tips and tricks that you can add on top of the fundamentals and help you become a better writer.

I’ve collected the best 33 writing tips I use. Some of these are things I came up with in my career writing 4 New York Times bestsellers (that sold over 4 million copies). Most of the lessons didn’t originate with me. They’re quotes and learnings I got from other great writers and Authors — some famous, some not — that have helped me in my career. …


If you’re interested in plant medicine, but have no idea where to start, this might help.

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I’m one year into my plant medicine journey.

I’ve done 6 MDMA therapy sessions, and 3 Psilocybin therapy sessions. I wrote about my first two MDMA sessions here (that article got a lot of attention).

I’m still a beginner. I’m in no position to tell anyone what to do in their life.

But I am willing to share what I’ve learned on my journey, publicly, and as a result, I get a lot of questions from people who want to begin their plant medicine journey. The most common question I get is:

“Where do I start? How do I even think about this?”


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Before you start writing your book, let’s talk about what can you expect during your journey.

At Scribe, we’ve helped over 1,200 authors write their books, and probably the #1 thing that separates those who finish their books from those who do not is having the proper expectations going in.

Why?

Because writing a book is hard, and if you’re not prepared for that fact, you’re far more likely to stall, and even quit.

But if you know the difficulty of what’s coming, you can mentally prepare to get past those obstacles when they come (and they will).

As my military friends like to say, “Proper preparation prevents piss poor performance.” …


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Should I self-publish or traditionally publish? Which is better right now?”

This is one of the most common questions we get at Scribe.

The problem with this question is the answer can be very complex. There are so many different factors that could possibly come into play, and the answers are not always cut and dry.

But…it’s only complicated for about 2% of authors.

For 97% of authors, the answer is very clear: self-publishing is the right choice.

For the other 1% of authors, the answer is very clear in the other direction: traditional publishing is the better choice.

This post is for that 98% of authors who should clearly go one way or the other, and is designed to help you easily and quickly understand which side you are on. …


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When we ask authors why they want to write a book, most of them focus on their branding or business goals. Those are legitimate goals, and books help greatly with both.

But those aren’t the only goals.

Many authors also want to achieve intangible goals, things like “helping people” and “personal growth.”

They often mention them as an aside, almost as if they’re embarrassed about having these sorts of goals. As if it’s not appropriate for a business person to have emotions.

But when we talk to our authors after their books are out, they’re almost all impacted the most by these “intangible” benefits of their book. …

About

Tucker Max

Co-founder of Scribe (www.scribewriting.com), Author of four NY Times #1 best sellers [contact: tucker@scribemedia.com]

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