The truth has got its boots on: what the evidence says about Mr. Damore’s Google memo

Introduction

Who I am

Why am I writing this?

Why should you trust anything I have to say about science?

Relevant professional background

Why citations matter

Laying out Mr. Damore’s arguments

What is a biological difference, anyway?

Universal across all cultures… are we sure?

Clear biological origins turning muddy: let’s talk about prenatal testosterone

Castrated boys raised as girls identify as boys: how did life turn out for David Reimer, anyway?

A brief definition of heritability: are gender differences in traits heritable?

Fitting predictions from evolutionary psychology perspective exactly

A note about figures, variation, and plots

Sources cited by Mr. Damore

Citation 75

Are women actually more interested in people and prettiness than things and systems?

Even assuming they are, do we know those differences are biological in nature?

Why might female extraversion be more frequently expressed in terms of gregariousness than assertiveness?

Let’s talk about neuroticism

Men’s higher drive for status

A historical note on career status, gender, and pay

Non-discriminatory ways to reduce the gender gap: curiously ineffective

Are Google’s attempts to redress existing structural inequality harmful to men?

Why we have biases (Just not me; I’m magical)

Acknowledgements

Further reading

Please give me more articles online! I want more perspectives specifically on this memo!

Please give me more in-depth books that dig into more detail on this topic!

I was really interested in that thing you were saying about gender as a dialogue! What did you mean you had a better block quote?

Footnotes

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Erin Giglio

Erin Giglio

PhD student and MeFite at UT Austin working on singing mice (Scotinomys). Interested in sexual selection, energy allocation, communication, and social behavior.