In today’s day and age, it is all about extraordinary experiences. Younger consumers have high expectations and like to see out of the box thinking. As the consumer market grows in saturation, brands must come up with new, refreshing strategies to stand out and entice their customers.

Image from Unsplash of a Rubik’s Cube on a White Background
Image from Unsplash of a Rubik’s Cube on a White Background
Image Courtesy of Unsplash.


It is hardwired in our DNA to constantly compare. We might think that we have something that works great and fits the needs, but when we discover something better, instantly the previous item is discarded and replaced. With all design constantly trying to be “better”, it would seem difficult for there ever to be a resolved solution.

A photo of a man sitting in a gate terminal of an airport
A photo of a man sitting in a gate terminal of an airport
Photo from Unsplash, courtesy of Suganth


Universal design principles — we all follow them, sometimes even guilty of assuming it applies to everything, whether it is a shopping app for the Chinese market or a food delivery app for the European market. It is not unusual to forget that cultures are an important context that underlines user-centric design.

Recognising the need is the primary condition for design. The details are details. They make the product. The connections, the connections, the connections.
— Charles Eames


It has always been the mystery million dollar question where both sides have provided plenty of arguments as to why designers should, or should not code. Rather than write an extensive, lengthy response on this never-ending debate, here are my simple, personal two cents on the matter.


Inspiration is all around us. As designers, we are used to different ways of thinking and approaching complex problems. Like the tools in a plumber’s tool box, we all have our varied methods of working. Some are common knowledge, others are combinations of our own processes and experiences.

Cassandra Tang

A multidisciplinary designer who is fascinated by experimentation, human behaviour and sushi. http://cassandratang.me

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