A CHALLENGING LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Finally the long awaited day was here. A watched pot never boils. An hour seems like a month and a day like a year. I arrived at the venue well dressed for the occasion. Ooh My God! Sometimes high expectations lead to great disappointments. I looked around to see if anyone was together with the trainer, maybe I assumed we were all sailing on the same boat playing catch up. Like really! I just hate being in this position. Should I tell the trainer to stop and repeat whatever he has taught or just ask my neighbor who seemed more lost than I was? I thought for a while. When I recovered from my thoughts, it was already break time.

This was the first day of learning GIS. We had like a month to go before the course was done with and we were to go out to the field. In the field is where you deliver what you have learnt in class. If you learn nothing at all, you will deliver absolutely nothing. I can’t imagine wasting a whole month, bearing in mind time is the most precious commodity. Back in the days when I was in primary school, our head teacher used to keep on telling us, if you have to eat a frog, eat the fattest and the juiciest. Let’s take an example you eat a small piece of a frog like an eye and someone else decides to swallow the whole frog. You will both report you ate a frog, so why don’t you select the best frog. Does it sound Yuk, based on how slippery a frog is?

After the break, I decided to request the trainer to conduct a recap on what he had taught in the first session. It was impossible due to time constraints plus we were behind schedule. Just put yourself in that position where the Math’s teacher is teaching about vectors and you are there wondering whether those are cows or goats. I knew this is what I wanted. I had owned it already and my attitude was not about to change due to the first day’s experience. After the day was over, I went home and watched tutorials until the concept was on my fingertips. I also discussed with my colleagues because I believe in teamwork. I didn’t believe it during the GIS graduation looking back at the successful field projects, we had completed with my colleagues. Teamwork is power. Try it, if you don’t believe it.

A CHALLENGING LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Finally the long awaited day was here. A watched pot never boils. An hour seems like a month and a day like a year. I arrived at the venue well dressed for the occasion. Ooh My God! Sometimes high expectations lead to great disappointments. I looked around to see if anyone was together with the trainer, maybe I assumed we were all sailing on the same boat playing catch up. Like really! I just hate being in this position. Should I tell the trainer to stop and repeat whatever he has taught or just ask my neighbor who seemed more lost than I was? I thought for a while. When I recovered from my thoughts, it was already break time.

This was the first day of learning GIS. We had like a month to go before the course was done with and we were to go out to the field. In the field is where you deliver what you have learnt in class. If you learn nothing at all, you will deliver absolutely nothing. I can’t imagine wasting a whole month, bearing in mind time is the most precious commodity. Back in the days when I was in primary school, our head teacher used to keep on telling us, if you have to eat a frog, eat the fattest and the juiciest. Let’s take an example you eat a small piece of a frog like an eye and someone else decides to swallow the whole frog. You will both report you ate a frog, so why don’t you select the best frog. Does it sound Yuk, based on how slippery a frog is?

After the break, I decided to request the trainer to conduct a recap on what he had taught in the first session. It was impossible due to time constraints plus we were behind schedule. Just put yourself in that position where the Math’s teacher is teaching about vectors and you are there wondering whether those are cows or goats. I knew this is what I wanted. I had owned it already and my attitude was not about to change due to the first day’s experience. After the day was over, I went home and watched tutorials until the concept was on my fingertips. I also discussed with my colleagues because I believe in teamwork. I didn’t believe it during the GIS graduation looking back at the successful field projects, we had completed with my colleagues. Teamwork is power. Try it, if you don’t believe it.

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