Delving into the history of the University of Calgary

This year, the University of Calgary is celebrating its 50th Anniversary, making this the perfect time for Continuing Education to offer a history course that delves deep into the school’s archives.

Exploring the History of the University of Calgary will be the last course in the One Day @ UCalgary spring series. Facilitated by associate archivist Karen Buckley, the course will run on Saturday, May 14, from 9 am to 4 pm at a special anniversary price of $50. Buckley, who has worked in the University’s archives since 1996, knew exactly where to look to find the most interesting facts and stories to share with students.

“The class won’t be a linear history of the University, although it will start with a brief history leading up to autonomy in 1966,” says Buckley. “After that, we’ll look at a range of topics such as university governance, which is sure to be an interesting and sometimes humorous discussion. Then, there is the beginning of computers and automation on campus, the status of women over the years, and university finances — or, why the university never has enough money.

“Everything we discover will be directly from the corporate record — we’ll be learning exactly what the university itself has to say about its history.”

Highlights will include a walking tour of the Swann Mall, a tour of the archival storage area and an opportunity to look at some archival documents.

“My hope is that there is something for everyone in this class,” adds Buckley. “People can look forward to some lighter topics too, such as: Why is the Professional Faculties Building so pink? Is that really a prairie chicken? And Did the MacKimmie Tower really sink from the weight of the library books?”

Click here to learn more or register for Exploring the History of the University of Calgary.

This story originally appeared in our April 2016 Newsletter. Click here to view the newsletter, and here to subscribe.

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