How to Stalk Yourself: A Manual for Creatives Filling the Gaps in their Curriculum Vitae
Carrie Cutforth
41

some great tips – recently i’ve moved 13 blogs, pods, columns and other feeds into one big site and now organizing and coalescing the all artifacts from various speaking gigs. So many links are expired, images removed, videos down (thanks blip.tv) and so on.

I have a few tips to add:

  • Archive.org’s Wayback Machine is a great way to capture some – not all — old posts and reviews etc. Mainstream media outlets are the worst it seems for archiving — plus some sites block Archive with a robots.txt file prohibiting indexing and/or some dynamically generated sites don’t archive well so your mileage may vary
  • Before i do an event, i set up a Hootsuite dashboard to monitor all the conference or whatever’s conversation. Instagram & Twitter hashtags, Youtube, geo-located searches and variations on my name and company name (when applicable)
  • Once i am done a prezo or other gig, i’ll quickly favourite, star, like whatever all the relevant posts (usually at the airport) and then, soon after, create an archive “roundup” in Storify (used to do manually but this is so quick).
  • I keep monitoring for a week or two for any blog followups, news mentions etc. and then add to the Storify. Storify will send each person mentioned a Tweet thanking them for the contribution
  • Once done, i create a roundup blog post for each gig including a preface for context. I often now copy/paste almost entire posts (with a preface) since so many things are lost to the ether
  • Then i add the event to a “Speaking Gigs” list on a page which references back to the roundup post

The Internet has a very short memory indeed.

PS examples (in process) at: daveostory.com

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