Discover The Isle of Dogs In London: A Virtual Walkthrough

The Isle of Dogs is a great example of growing as an economy with hard work and dedication to the areas business reputation. With surroundings of the River Thames and Canary Wharf Sky scrapers, the area is increasingly becoming high- end and attractive. As one of London’s two business epicentres, The Isle of Dogs is offering far more than just “business acumen”- Lord Sugar.

AROUND THE CORNER

The neighbourhood thrives with business, top-level jobs and an eclectic combination of homes.

With its geographical location perfect for trade, the Isle of Dogs has always been a monument of business in London. The historic half-island is situated in the ‘horse shoe-like’ part of the River Thames and was where Henry VIII kept his royal dogs, thus, the given name ‘Isle of Dogs’. The area is a booming society for working professionals aswell as being surrounded by homes, parks, schools and much more.

THE NEIGHBOURS

Mostly young professionals and some families.

There is only a small percentage of the population in the Isle of Dogs with whom are children, slightly lower than the average in London in fact. However, it is a relatively popular area for families with facilities such as the Mudchute Farm and schools in the Tower Hamlets Borough. The neighbourhood is most popular with single working professionals and students, who make up to 76% of the area’s population.

WHAT TO EXPECT

A busy and well-connected area.

Most of the former warehouses are converted into luxury offices and luxury apartments. A mecca of finance, several large companies, have also taken up residence, including HSBC, BP and Reuters. Economically developed, this neighbourhood includes the district of Canary Wharf, the “new” financial district of London. The banks of the Thames are now popular with London’s elite with a broad range of bars and restaurants that are often busy with nightlife.

For transport, there are many DLR stations in the area, including West India Quay, Canary Wharf, South Quay, Heron Quays, Crossharbour, Mudchute and Island Gardens. Canary Wharf is also connected to the underground via the Jubilee line, making it also very easy to travel in and around London.

AROUND THE CORNER

The neighbourhood thrives with business, top-level jobs and an eclectic combination of homes.

With its geographical location perfect for trade, the Isle of Dogs has always been a monument of business in London. The historic half-island is situated in the ‘horse shoe-like’ part of the River Thames and was where Henry VIII kept his royal dogs, thus, the given name ‘Isle of Dogs’. The area is a booming society for working professionals aswell as being surrounded by homes, parks, schools and much more.

THE NEIGHBOURS

Mostly young professionals and some families.

There is only a small percentage of the population in the Isle of Dogs with whom are children, slightly lower than the average in London in fact. However, it is a relatively popular area for families with facilities such as the Mudchute Farm and schools in the Tower Hamlets Borough. The neighbourhood is most popular with single working professionals and students, who make up to 76% of the area’s population.

WHAT TO EXPECT

A busy and well-connected area.

Most of the former warehouses are converted into luxury offices and luxury apartments. A mecca of finance, several large companies, have also taken up residence, including HSBC, BP and Reuters. Economically developed, this neighbourhood includes the district of Canary Wharf, the “new” financial district of London. The banks of the Thames are now popular with London’s elite with a broad range of bars and restaurants that are often busy with nightlife.

For transport, there are many DLR stations in the area, including West India Quay, Canary Wharf, South Quay, Heron Quays, Crossharbour, Mudchute and Island Gardens. Canary Wharf is also connected to the underground via the Jubilee line, making it also very easy to travel in and around London.

THE LIFESTYLE

London’s go-to concert arena, canal strolls, museums, days and nights out.

World famous artists and performers choose North Greenwich’s O2 Arena to hold high profile concerts and events. With very easy access to restaurants and bars, the Entertainment centre is a great addition to the area and residents. The beloved Cutty Sark is one of many features for the half-island, including The National Maritime Museum, The Observatory and Island Gardens with entrance to the Greenwich foot tunnel.

WHAT NOT TO EXPECT

Busy day, relaxing night.

The Isle of Dogs while surrounded by young working professionals is not the area for epic nights out, the resident bars and clubs are perfect for a quick bite and catch up. Enjoying the work ethic and modern architecture is something to expect, finding the social scene in different parts of East London is a short train ride away.

AROUND THE CORNER

The neighbourhood thrives with business, top-level jobs and an eclectic combination of homes.

With its geographical location perfect for trade, the Isle of Dogs has always been a monument of business in London. The historic half-island is situated in the ‘horse shoe-like’ part of the River Thames and was where Henry VIII kept his royal dogs, thus, the given name ‘Isle of Dogs’. The area is a booming society for working professionals aswell as being surrounded by homes, parks, schools and much more.

THE NEIGHBOURS

Mostly young professionals and some families.

There is only a small percentage of the population in the Isle of Dogs with whom are children, slightly lower than the average in London in fact. However, it is a relatively popular area for families with facilities such as the Mudchute Farm and schools in the Tower Hamlets Borough. The neighbourhood is most popular with single working professionals and students, who make up to 76% of the area’s population.

WHAT TO EXPECT

A busy and well-connected area.

Most of the former warehouses are converted into luxury offices and luxury apartments. A mecca of finance, several large companies, have also taken up residence, including HSBC, BP and Reuters. Economically developed, this neighbourhood includes the district of Canary Wharf, the “new” financial district of London. The banks of the Thames are now popular with London’s elite with a broad range of bars and restaurants that are often busy with nightlife.

For transport, there are many DLR stations in the area, including West India Quay, Canary Wharf, South Quay, Heron Quays, Crossharbour, Mudchute and Island Gardens. Canary Wharf is also connected to the underground via the Jubilee line, making it also very easy to travel in and around London.

THE LIFESTYLE

London’s go-to concert arena, canal strolls, museums, days and nights out.

World famous artists and performers choose North Greenwich’s O2 Arena to hold high profile concerts and events. With very easy access to restaurants and bars, the Entertainment centre is a great addition to the area and residents. The beloved Cutty Sark is one of many features for the half-island, including The National Maritime Museum, The Observatory and Island Gardens with entrance to the Greenwich foot tunnel.

WHAT NOT TO EXPECT

Busy day, relaxing night.

The Isle of Dogs while surrounded by young working professionals is not the area for epic nights out, the resident bars and clubs are perfect for a quick bite and catch up. Enjoying the work ethic and modern architecture is something to expect, finding the social scene in different parts of East London is a short train ride away.

THE MARKET

Displaying a wide diversity of homes with high-rise apartments amongst social housing, quaint cottages and new build homes.

The Isle of Dogs is ideal for first-time buyers. The need of ex-dockers and fisherman still living in the area often jars with desires of the new wealthy business crowd. The mixture of social housing, high rise apartment buildings, new build homes and cottages gives the area a different residence. The country style areas are situated just outside Canary Wharf, around Kew bridge there are office buildings. Amongst the opposite side of the isle houses beautiful quaint cottages, terraces, waterside apartments and plenty of new builds on the way for first-time buyers.

AROUND THE CORNER

The neighbourhood thrives with business, top-level jobs and an eclectic combination of homes.

With its geographical location perfect for trade, the Isle of Dogs has always been a monument of business in London. The historic half-island is situated in the ‘horse shoe-like’ part of the River Thames and was where Henry VIII kept his royal dogs, thus, the given name ‘Isle of Dogs’. The area is a booming society for working professionals aswell as being surrounded by homes, parks, schools and much more.

THE NEIGHBOURS

Mostly young professionals and some families.

There is only a small percentage of the population in the Isle of Dogs with whom are children, slightly lower than the average in London in fact. However, it is a relatively popular area for families with facilities such as the Mudchute Farm and schools in the Tower Hamlets Borough. The neighbourhood is most popular with single working professionals and students, who make up to 76% of the area’s population.

WHAT TO EXPECT

A busy and well-connected area.

Most of the former warehouses are converted into luxury offices and luxury apartments. A mecca of finance, several large companies, have also taken up residence, including HSBC, BP and Reuters. Economically developed, this neighbourhood includes the district of Canary Wharf, the “new” financial district of London. The banks of the Thames are now popular with London’s elite with a broad range of bars and restaurants that are often busy with nightlife.

For transport, there are many DLR stations in the area, including West India Quay, Canary Wharf, South Quay, Heron Quays, Crossharbour, Mudchute and Island Gardens. Canary Wharf is also connected to the underground via the Jubilee line, making it also very easy to travel in and around London.

THE LIFESTYLE

London’s go-to concert arena, canal strolls, museums, days and nights out.

World famous artists and performers choose North Greenwich’s O2 Arena to hold high profile concerts and events. With very easy access to restaurants and bars, the Entertainment centre is a great addition to the area and residents. The beloved Cutty Sark is one of many features for the half-island, including The National Maritime Museum, The Observatory and Island Gardens with entrance to the Greenwich foot tunnel.

WHAT NOT TO EXPECT

Busy day, relaxing night.

The Isle of Dogs while surrounded by young working professionals is not the area for epic nights out, the resident bars and clubs are perfect for a quick bite and catch up. Enjoying the work ethic and modern architecture is something to expect, finding the social scene in different parts of East London is a short train ride away.

THE MARKET

Displaying a wide diversity of homes with high-rise apartments amongst social housing, quaint cottages and new build homes.

The Isle of Dogs is ideal for first-time buyers. The need of ex-dockers and fisherman still living in the area often jars with desires of the new wealthy business crowd. The mixture of social housing, high rise apartment buildings, new build homes and cottages gives the area a different residence. The country style areas are situated just outside Canary Wharf, around Kew bridge there are office buildings. Amongst the opposite side of the isle houses beautiful quaint cottages, terraces, waterside apartments and plenty of new builds on the way for first-time buyers.

YOU’LL FALL IN LOVE WITH

The buzz of the worker bees and the well-deserved relaxation.

With a broad range of transportation (Eco-friendly included), you’re able to travel around the half-island quickly and easily! Fall in love with the and work ethic that grows every day, the view of the Thames and the sense of community.

This article originally appeared in HomeHapp.