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In what has been a roller-coaster of a year, Black Friday is here to bring some cheer! Our friends over at the Interaction Design Foundation (IxDF) have a gift for you: 25% off UX design courses for the next year!

The offer begins Friday, 27 November, and ends at midnight on Cyber Monday.

Looking to expand your current skill set or researching to kickstart a career in UX design? Then look no further. This Black Friday weekend, the IxDF is offering 25% off on their annual membership to help you with your career growth.

In case you are familiar with the Interaction Design Foundation, here are some reviews:

“A goldmine of information on interaction design.”

— Don Norman

“Ivy League level education in UX, Product Design, or Human-Computer Interaction.”

— Forbes.com

With screentime shooting through the roof, the demand for UX professionals continues to grow. Glassdoor has found that in the United States, UI and UX designers have an average yearly salary of $85,277, and experienced UI and UX designers can earn up to $128,000. It is an ideal time for investing in a credible education provider who can teach you the in-demand UX skills. …


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Written by Tyler Tafelsky

Unlike a decade ago when you could rank a site purely based on keywords and backlinks, nowadays, user engagement variables like bounce rate, time on site, and pages visited have all become critical ranking factors.

Google recognizes real human behavior when it comes to determining quality sites worthy of top search rankings. In turn, usability and UX design have become integral components to SEO. Not only does a site require fundamental on-page SEO, but simple UX design considerations can go a long way in supporting engagement, and therefore, rankings.

To help shed light on where to prioritize your efforts, below we highlight five practices on how to effectively leverage UX design and usability variables to support your site’s SEO performance. …


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Written by Anders Toxboe

Don’t just copy persuasive design. It will backfire. Here’s how to successfully build persuasive design into your larger strategy.

Persuasive design elements like points, badges, reputation, and scarcity warnings are meaningless as stand-alone systems, but can be helpful in supporting a larger strategy as a use experience unfolds over time.

For Persuasive design elements to work together, they need to be stitched together into a coherent whole. In this article, we will explore several frameworks that will help you create such a design strategy as well as help you design for the changing experience over time. …


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Written by Luis Garcia

During the design process, dealing with stakeholders could be difficult, if not directly, a problem due to the blind love that some feel for the field of knowledge in which they are involved in. That feeling could bring complexity to the service or product under consideration. As designers, we need to know how to deal with this issue.

I like to define UX designers’ activity as that of a ‘Complexity Avoider’. Basically, we identify, analyze and solve a problem with the overarching aim to simplify a complex reality. It sounds very sophisticated but is not. In most cases it’s just about changing the problem’s frame. Therefore, it is essential that someone helps us to understand the dimension of the problem and to be allowed to change the way things are done in a certain domain. …


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Written by Lesley Vos

So you think that it’s a fantastic design that makes users love and happily interact with your website. Think again.

Most designers and web developers go mad on UI and UX today. In recent years, this niche overgrows and plays a significant role in many big companies worldwide. It seems everyone wants to be a UX designer and create beautiful websites for ultimate usability.

But there’s a catch:

Visitors don’t come to websites for design. They come for information.

In other words, all those color and psychology-based design hacks work only when coupled with text: A smart combination of words and design is what guarantees stellar usability and happy user experience. …


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Written by Eric Moore

The open office concept exemplified by tech giants and hip startups has reached Corporate America. The notion of stuffy cubicles and conference rooms has faded as unassigned seating and remote work takes over. But beer Fridays, ping-pong tables and nap rooms don’t answer the real question about getting work done. We need an alternative worldview and it starts by asking what would Starbuck’s do?

Ping! Ta-Da! Bloop! Woo-hoo!

These are the undeniable sounds of instant messages, email, Slack, Teams, and Trello–tools for the digital workforce. …


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Written by David Gevorkian

Accessible design is an inclusive solution in providing a structural pathway for better navigation and a great user experience for people with or without physical, emotional, and mental limitations.

Adopting a user-centric mindset and complying with various web accessibility requirements mandated by Americans with Disabilities Act ( ADA), Section 508 and WCAG standards isn’t only crucial and required but is also practical. Otherwise, you’re risking your reputation, your brand, and your sales revenue. Aside from that, non-compliance can get you sued.

Considering web accessibility standards in UX development is not only about provisioning for the disabled. …


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Written by Justin Mifsud

In various instances during my research I come across articles and recommendations that tend to confuse usability with accessibility. The objective of this post is to establish the link between the two terms while outlining their differences. In order to do so, it is important to first understand what is web site usability and web site accessibility.

What is Web Site Usability?

The term “usability” was created in the early 1980’s to refer to what was then a number of vague and subjective attributes of a product, collectively known as “user friendly characteristics” [1]. This marked the beginning of an important shift from a phrase that focused on the features of the interface of a product to a term that was becoming concerned with the various facets of the interaction as seen from the human action perspective [2]. …


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Written by Justin Mifsud

Having usable web site links is an essential consideration for anyone who is developing or owns a web site. Links are a means for the user to navigate to other pages within the same web site or view related documents and external sites. Having usable links effectively means that users are more likely to achieve the objective of why they are in your web site (be it for information searching purposes or purchasing of products or services). …


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Written by Justin Mifsud

In Part 1 of this post, we explored five techniques that will help you overcome the typical difficulties that you may encounter when trying to sell web site usability evaluation as a service to a company. These techniques have been summarized in an easy-to-remember sentence: First understand usability, then explain the benefits in a language that the company understands, in terms of ROI and for the sole benefit of the user. …

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We care (a lot!) about Usability.

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