COVID-19 in NYC: October hot spots

In the last several weeks, though New Yorkers have been enjoying things slowly reopening and having a little more freedom to go out and about and enjoy outdoor dining with indoor dining around the corner and gyms reopened, cases slowly started rising again. …


What makes someone have lasting immunity to COVID-19? This is a burning question in order to understand how to protect against the virus and sustain immunity. This also has implications for the various vaccines that are either in development or in testing phases. We often hear about antibodies. Never before has the world learned so much about immunology and everyone’s medical knowledge in this area is being tested. Antibodies which have usually been discussed scientifically or medically are now part of the household vocabulary.

In terms of COVID-19, we often hear about antibody immunity, but the level of understanding of how long someone needs antibodies to be immune to the disease or if other mechanisms of immunity exist are not well understood. What is mostly being assumed is that if one has been infected and recovers from the disease, then one must have a high level of antibodies to COVID-19 in their blood. What remains mysterious is how long that immunity lasts for survivors. Also, what is the possibility one could be artificially made immune to COVID-19 by being given antibodies through convalescent plasma or through vaccination? …


New York City had been the an epicenter of the pandemic in the United States in the spring from March to May until cases and hospitalizations started dipping. Now NYC is now longer an epicenter after having gone through this first wave while many other parts of the country are going through their own first wave. One of the biggest questions on most people’s minds is whether this first wave will pass finally once and for all or whether there will be a resurgence as a 2nd wave.

Most experts seem to suggest that there may be more infections but less morbidity and mortality. This is especially due to practitioners and researchers learning more about how to treat COVID-19 symptoms as they have developed various protocols or discovered certain treatments along the way which help in dealing with the virus. This is certainly better than in early April, when as the virus was tearing through NYC, physicians were trying to grapple with the various symptoms and understand a strategy with which to deal this it while being overwhelmed by the incredible influx of sick patients. This helped a lot in bringing the curve down and reducing the disease impact. Use of Remdesivir, convalescent plasma, and anticoagulation protocols helped to bring the curve down as well. However, what has been happening in the rest of the country is reminiscent of that burden. One would think that the strategies learned in NYC and the northeast in general would translate to the rest of the country and would have controlled a first wave, but that did not all seem to happen and the wave of positive cases and hospitalizations had also gone up dramatically. …

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Usha Govindarajulu

Usha Govindarajulu is a writer and biostatistician . www.UshaGovindarajulu.com