ADAA 25/01/17 (Million Dead, The Fall of Troy)

So here’s the first edition of Another Day, Another Album(s). In which you’ll see how much I suck at writing and have the opportunity to listen to a few good albums. Also the “reviews” will be like that — few sentences about the band, how I came by them and may be what I like and picked up from one listen. The main reason is that I’m usually listening while working so my mind is not 100% in the music, so don’t expect in depth analysis. Also if anyone (of the three people that will read this) have any recommendations — comment or write me a message somewhere, my instagram and last.fm are in the introduction post. Let’s go!

Million Dead — A Song to Ruin
year:
2003; genre: post-hardcore; 
country: UK; active: no;
listen@: Spotify
links: nothing official

The first album by Million Dead. I’ve been a fan of Frank Turner’s Mongol Horde for quite some time and decided to finally listen his “proper” post-hardcore albums. I liked it very much, it really shows Frank’s ability to alter between screams and clean vocals, both of which sound great. The instrumentals are what I would expect from a post-hardcore band. I also love that the album finishes with a 14 minute song which is a bit repetitive but in the right way.

Million Dead — Harmony No Harmony
year:
2005; genre: post-hardcore; 
country: UK; active: no;
listen@: Spotify
links: nothing official

I continued exploring Million Dead’s music with their second album. It’s a bit different from “A Song to Ruin” by being more melodic. The vocals and guitars reminded me a bit of American Football, which I like very much. All in all great two albums to which I might be returning to soon.

The Fall of Troy — The Fall of Troy
year:
2003; genre: post-hardcore/mathcore/progressive metal; 
country: US; active: yes;
listen@: Spotify
links: web; bandcamp; facebook;

After mentioning Million Dead to a friend he was somehow reminded about The Fall of Troy. He linked me two random songs which really grabbed my attention so I played their first album. Being a huge fan of Protest the Hero I was hooked really fast. It’s a combination of hardcore, pop punk, math and some progressive. The fact that this album was written and recorded while they were 17 years old is simply amazing. It reminded me of PTH’s “A Calculated Use of Sound”, which was written when they were 16. I’ll definitely hear The Fall of Troy’s other albums soon.

That’s it for today I hope someone is somehow intrigued by this post and the music in it. I also have ideas for some retrospective posts like albums I liked and loved from 2016 or albums from earlier this month that won’t get in ADAA since they’re not new for me, but we’ll see.

Cheers!

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