PULITZER PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION FROM 1962 TO PRESENT

Too see Fiction List

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1. The Making of the President, 1960 by Theodore White
 The Making of the President, 1960, written by Theodore White analyzes the 1960 election in which John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States. The book, written in a novelistic st…
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2. The Guns of August by Barbara Tuchman
 The Guns of August, originally published as August 1914 (1962), is a military history book written by Barbara Tuchman. It primarily describes the events of the first month of World War I. The focus…
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3. Anti-intellectualism in American Life by Richard Hofstadter
 Written in response to the political and intellectual conditions of the 1950s, Anti-intellectualism in American Life emerged as a grand attack on the institutions to which society historically entr…
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4. O Strange New World by Howard Mumford Jones
 O Strange New World: American Culture-The Formative Years was written by Howard Mumford Jones and published by Viking Press in 1964; it won the 1965 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.
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5. Wandering Through Winter by Edwin Way Teale
 This book documents the travels of a naturalist and his wife, Nellie I. Teale who spent four winter months traveling twenty thousand miles across the southwestern United States and parts of the Mid…
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6. The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture by David Brion Davis
 The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture written by David Brion Davis and published by Cornell University Press in 1966 won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1967.
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7. Rousseau and Revolution by Will and Ariel Durant
 Rousseau and Revolution: A History of Civilization in France, England, and Germany from 1756, and in the Remainder of Europe from 1715, to 1789. This volume centers on Jean-Jacques Rousseau and …
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8. Children of Crisis by Robert Coles
 Children of Crisis is an award winning series of 5 volumes by child psychiatrist and author Robert Coles published by Little, Brown and Company between 1967 and 1977; a social study of children in …
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9. The Armies of the Night by Norman Mailer
 The Armies of the Night (1968) is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning nonfiction novel written by Norman Mailer and sub-titled History as a Novel/The Novel as History. Mailer essential…
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10. So Human an Animal by René Dubos
 Until cloning becomes the order of the day, the author contends that each human is unique. Every person faces the danger of losing this humanness to mechanized surroundings. Is the human species be…
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11. Gandhi’s Truth by Erik H. Erikson
 Gandhi’s Truth: On the Origins of Militant Nonviolence, written by Erik H. Erikson and published by W. W. Norton & Company in 1969, it won the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the 19…
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12. The Rising Sun by John Toland
 A chronicle of the World War II rise and fall of the Japanese empire, from the invasion of Manchuria and China to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From the Japanese perspective, in the…
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13. Stilwell and the American Experience in China by Barbara Wertheim Tuchman
 Using the life of Joseph Stilwell, the military attache to China in 1935–39 and commander of United States forces and allied chief of staff to Chiang Kai-shek in 1942–44, this book explores the his…
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14. Fire in the Lake by Frances FitzGerald
 Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam, written by Frances FitzGerald and published by both Back Bay Publishing and Little, Brown and Company in 1972, in 1973 won the Pulitze…
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15. The Denial of Death by Ernest Becker
 The basic premise of The Denial of Death is that human civilization is ultimately an elaborate, symbolic defense mechanism against the knowledge of our mortality, which in turn acts as the emotiona…
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16. Why Survive? Being Old in America by Robert Neil Butler
 Dr. Butler’s eloquent, exhaustive and formidably informed book is a work of genuine consequence. He’s a physician-psychiatrist-gerontologist who also teaches and is Consultant to the U.S. Senate Co…
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17. Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard
 Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is a 1974 nonfiction narrative book by Annie Dillard. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1975. The book is about Dillard’s experiences at Tinker Creek, which is located in Virg…
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18. Beautiful Swimmers by William Warner
 William Warner exhibits his skill as a naturalist and as a writer in this Pulitzer Prize-winning study of the pugnacious Atlantic blue crab and of its Chesapeake Bay territory.
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19. The Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan
 The Dragons of Eden: Speculations on the Evolution of Human Intelligence is a Pulitzer prize winning 1977 book by Carl Sagan. In it, he combines the fields of anthropology, evolutionary biology, ps…
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20. Gödel, Escher, Bach by Douglas Hofstadter
 Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid (commonly GEB) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Douglas Hofstadter, described as “a metaphorical fugue on minds and machines in the spirit of Lewis C…
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21. On Human Nature by E. O. Wilson
 On Human Nature is a 1979 Pulitzer prize-winning book by the Harvard biologist E. O. Wilson. The book tries to explain how different characteristics of humans and society can be explained from the …
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22. Fin-de-Siècle Vienna by Carl E. Schorske
 Fin-de-Siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture, written by American cultural historian Carl E. Schorske won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. It has been described as a magnificent revel…
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23. The Soul of a New Machine by Tracy Kidder
 Tracy Kidder’s non-fiction book, The Soul of a New Machine, chronicles the experiences of an engineering team racing to design a next generation computer under a blistering schedule and tremendous …
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24. The Social Transformation of American Medicine by Paul Starr
 The Social Transformation of American Medicine is a book written by Paul Starr and published by Basic Books in 1982. It won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction as well as the Bancroft P…
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25. Is There No Place On Earth For Me? by Susan Sheehan
 This book recounts the lonely, harrowing life of Sylvia Frumkin who is diagnosed schizophrenic. Is There No Place On Earth For Me? written by Susan Sheehan and published in 1982 by Houghton Miff…
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26. The Good War by Studs Terkel
 “The Good War”: An Oral History of World War Two is a telling of the oral history of World War II written by Studs Terkel. The work won the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. It is a firs…
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27. Move Your Shadow by Joseph Lelyveld
 Move Your Shadow: South Africa, Black and White, written by Joseph Lelyveld and published by Times Books in 1985, won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction as well as the 1986 Los Angeles…
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28. Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas
 The book traces the history of three families: the African-American Twymons, the Irish McGoffs and the Yankee Divers. It gives brief genealogical histories of each families, focusing on how the eve…
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29. Arab and Jew by David K. Shipler
 Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land, written by David K. Shipler and published by Times Books in 1986, won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.
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30. The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes
 The Making of the Atomic Bomb, a book written by Richard Rhodes, won the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction, a National Book Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award. The 900-page bo…
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31. A Bright Shining Lie by Neil Sheehan
 A Bright Shining Lie is a book by Neil Sheehan, a former New York Times reporter who covered the Vietnam War. It is about U.S. Army retired Lieutenant Colonel John Paul Vann and the United States i…
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32. And Their Children After Them by Dale Maharidge and Michael Williamson
 And Their Children After Them, written by Dale Maharidge and Michael Williamson and published by Pantheon Books in 1989, won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.[1] It is about sharecro…
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33. The Ants by E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler
 This book is primarily aimed at academics as a reference work, detailing the anatomy, physiology, social organization, ecology, and natural history of ants. The Ants is a Pulitzer Prize-winning…
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34. The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power by Daniel Yergin
 The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power is Daniel Yergin’s 800-page history of the global oil industry from the 1850s through 1990. The Prize benefited from extraordinary timing: publis…
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35. Lincoln at Gettysburg by Garry Wills
 The book uses Lincoln’s notably short speech at Gettysburg to examine his rhetoric overall. In particular, Wills compares Lincoln’s speech to Edward Everett’s delivered on the same day, focusing on…
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36. Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire by David Remnick
 The book is equal parts history and eyewitness account, covering the collapse of the Soviet Union. Opening with the excavation of the corpses of men killed in the Katyn massacre, “Lenin’s Tomb” beg…
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37. The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time by Jonathan Weiner
 The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time winner of the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. this book on evolutionary biology written for the layperson by Jonathan Weiner in …
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38. The Haunted Land by Tina Rosenberg
 The Haunted Land: Facing Europe’s Ghosts After Communism written by Tina Rosenberg and published by Random House in 1995, won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the 1995 National B…
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39. Ashes to Ashes by Richard Kluger
 Ashes To Ashes: America’s Hundred-Year Cigarette War, The Public Health, And The Unabashed Triumph Of Philip Morris, written by Richard Kluger and published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1996, won the 1997…
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40. Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond
 Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies is a 1997 book by Jared Diamond, professor of geography and physiology at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). In 1998 it won a Pulitze…
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41. Annals of the Former World by John McPhee
 The book presents a geological history of North America, and was researched and written over the course of two decades beginning in 1978. It consists of a compilation of five books, the first four …
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42. Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II by John W. Dower
 The book covers the Occupation of Japan by the Allies between August 1945 and April 1952, delving into topics such as Douglas MacArthur’s administration, the Tokyo war crimes trials and Hirohito’s …
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43. Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan by Herbert P. Bix
 Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan is a book by Herbert P. Bix on Emperor Hirohito, emperor of Japan from December 25, 1926 until his death on January 7, 1989, won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for …
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44. Carry Me Home by Diane McWhorter
 Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama, the Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, written by Diane McWhorter and published by Simon & Schuster in 2001, won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize an…
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45. A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide by Samantha Power
 “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide is a book by Samantha Power, Professor of Human Rights Practice at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, which explores America’s un…
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46. Gulag: A History by Anne Applebaum
 The book charts the history of the Gulag organization from its beginnings in the Solovki prison camp and the construction of the White Sea Canal through its explosive growth in the Great Terror and…
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47. Ghost Wars by Steve Coll
 The book describes the CIA’s efforts in Afghanistan to include the covert paramilitary programs against the Soviet Union and the Taliban. It also includes detailed descriptions of operations that a…
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48. Imperial Reckoning by Caroline Elkins
 Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya written by Caroline Elkins, published by Henry Holt, won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.
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49. The Looming Tower by Lawrence Wright
 The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 is a historical look at the way in which Al-Qaeda came into being, the background for various terrorist attacks and how they were investigated, and …
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50. The Years of Extermination by Saul Friedlander
 The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939–1945 is the second volume of Saul Friedlander’s history of Nazi Germany and the Jews. It won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction i…
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51. Slavery by Another Name
 The book describes the exploitation of black Americans after the end of the American Civil War. Blackmon presents evidence that slavery in the United States did not end with the Civil War, instead …
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52. The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy by David Hoffman
 A history of the end of the arms race describes the Soviet Union’s development of an automatic retaliatory attack system, the United States’s efforts to create space-based missile defenses, and the…
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53. The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee
 An assessment of cancer addresses both the courageous battles against the disease and the misperceptions and hubris that have compromised modern understandings, providing coverage of such topics as…
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54. The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt
 Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-Fiction One of the world’s most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovati…
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55. Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America by Gilbert King
 Arguably the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century, Thurgood Marshall was on the verge of bringing the landmark suit Brown v. Board of Education before the U.S. Supreme Court when…
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56. Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin
 Recounts the decades-long saga of the New Jersey seaside town plagued by childhood cancers caused by air and water pollution due to the indiscriminate dumping of toxic chemicals.
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