Two truths and a lie about my vagabond life

Every time someone tells me how lucky I am to live this life I get uncomfortable.

Let’s get the first truth out of the way, I am. Lucky. And grateful.

Without the support of my company allowing me to work remotely, my family making peace with the fact of rarely seeing me and, most importantly, being healthy and free, I would have never been able to do this.

Here comes the first uncomfortable part, I didn’t stumble upon this path. I mean, I did and I did not. Life can be a series of fortunate events, but nothing happens by total chance. There is a theory called the theory of marginal gains that suggests that if we can make small ‘1% changes’ in our lives this tends to have a positive knock-on effect creating a virtuous circle of energy, growth, learning and change.

I clearly am not too afraid of shaking things up, I have lived in many cities and countries already, starting from scratch with my life many times, and it hasn’t always been easy to leave everything and start afresh, jobs, friends, annoying bureaucracy… It isn’t always as nice and shiny as it looks, I’m sure you’re smart enough to know that. It comes with challenges, loneliness at times, doubts and a constant wandering if you are trying to make your life better or just harder. Of course, I would do it all again.

On top of the world, well Croatia.

The initial move that has initiated my positive inertia from my London life has been joining an organisation called Escape the City for a Startup Tribe. I didn’t do it because I was hating my job as many others seeking for a career change, or because I felt the urge of starting up a business. I did it because I wanted to be surrounded by like-minded people that wanted to challenge the status quo, be curious about the possibilities life has to offer and learn something new, about Startups and ourselves. I found all of the above, and much more.

The main thing joining Escape did for me was making me think differently about the only thing towards which my approach had remained the same: work. They call it 21st century career, which means doing work that matters to you and on your terms, a concept designed around the needs of millennials (those born between 1980 and 1997) and the current economy. I clearly am aligned with most of the characteristics of this generation, but my Italian mentality wasn’t quite ready for looking at work from such a different perspective. Without this change in my mentality, Remote Year would have never happened.

We can always find good excuses for not having the life we want, or think we want, but the reality is that most obstacles are in our minds.

“When you have the courage to advance confidently in the direction of your dreams, you begin to draw upon the power of the universe. Life gives you what you ask of it. It is always listening.” 
 Robin S. Sharma, The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari: A Fable About Fulfilling Your Dreams Reaching Your Destiny
Like what you read? Give Valentina Candeloro a round of applause.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.