Real Enchanted Forests to Inspire Creativity

There is nothing more grounding than being in the forest. I’m going to share with you some real enchanted forests that you should visit. We have all imagined amazing places from the dark fairy tales we were told about as children. There is something instinctual and primal about being in the forest. It’s a place where creativity begins. There an underlying energy that every human can understand: The connection to nature. We are all part of an interconnected ecosystem, though urbanized populations have long forgotten it. When in the forest, it’s an energizing feeling. A place to reset your day, week, or even year.

I talked about he benefits of traveling on creativity previously. It can literally change you. When was the last time you traveled? When was the last time you visited the forest? Here are some real enchanted forests to check out:

Wistman’s Wood

Real Enchanted Forests

Wistman’s Wood has been mentioned in writing for hundreds of years. It is likely a left-over from the ancient forest that covered much of Dartmoor c. 7000 BC, before Mesolithic hunter/gatherers cleared it after around 5000 BC. Wistman’s Wood is one of only three remote high-altitude oakwoods on Dartmoor, Devon, England. The wood has been the inspiration for numerous artists, poets, photographers and appears in hundreds of nineteenth century accounts. One tradition holds that it was planted by Isabella de Fortibus (1237–93). The wood is described in detail and discussed as a point of great interest in The Tree, a 1978 essay on naturalism by English novelist John Fowles. (Excerpt from Wikipedia)

The Crooked Forest

real enchanted forests

The Crooked Forest , is a grove of oddly-shaped pine trees located outside Nowe Czarnowo, West Pomerania, Poland. This grove of approximately 100 pines was planted around 1930, when its location was still within the German province of Pomerania. Each pine tree bends sharply to the North just above ground level, then curves back upright after a sideways excursion of three to nine feet (1–3 m). It is generally believed that some form of human tool or technique was used to make the trees grow this way, but the method and motive are not currently known. It has been speculated that the trees may have been deformed to create naturally curved timber for use in furniture or boat building. Others surmise that a snowstorm could have knocked the trees like this, but to date nobody knows what really happened to these pine trees. (Excerpt from Wikipedia)

Caddo Lake

real enchanted forests

According to Caddo legend, the lake was formed by the 1811–12 New Madrid earthquakes. There may be some truth to the legend, as Reelfoot Lake in Tennessee was formed by that earthquake. Most geologists feel the lake was…Read the remainder of post

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