my freelancing records in past 18 months tells me one thing

velynne

“I got hired simply because I am a Chinese”

Photo by Green Chameleon on Unsplash

The major sign showing I take freelancing career seriousply is opening an Upwork account.

It took me a whole month to get the first case on Upwork and it was a big deal for me.I have had almost zero working experiences as a formal employer and I was (still I am)no expert on any fields on listed and I was not qualified to do anything. If there is any talent that wouldn’t get rejected easily, I guess that because my picture on the Upwork profile.

It’s not about the beauty, but the look.

There are quite numbers of bossiness on Upwork meet the problems cause by language, and I got an Asian look face, meaning I have the natural talent to solve it.The talent needs no papers and no working experiences. My face and my region says, this one can speak, read, and write Chinese.

The Canadian real estate company needed a Chinese virtual assistant to handle their Chinese clients, and it was an urgent affair.He asked, what time suits you to work from next week in the first interview.And I got the job.The is the everlasting job on my records, for 300 hours in the span of 6 months. The project could be going on since their Chinese real estate clients are always there and no ideal candidate show up by that time.But, I said no to the manager’s invitation.

Er…It’s not a directly ”no“,and this is a great case if I have payroll issue.Why would I cut by back path? I just could not respond with an enthusiastic tone and go chase every chance to improve my performance.

time zone china vs canada

The most difficult part of the job is to wake up at 5 or 6am. If I worked as normal hours like 8 am in Beijing time, that would be 4 pm in Vancouver time. The company did asked me to call as early as possible, I thought it would me not professional to do that at the end of working hours. The tasks are easy, call to pay, collect maintenance invoice, translate two languages, answer questions written manual and other administrative work.

No more, the ambitious me said.The prices of language skill varies, but knowing Chinese is simply too cheap. No more cases entitled with native Chinese, Chinese speaking, or in China which generally requires low-level of real competitive skill gives freelancer no growing space.

But my actions says, yes.After 18 months on working online( I had some other offline projects), Chinese is the key for all 8 cases on my records. That means one hundred percent of cases on my freelancing career is emphasized on bilingual skill.Why not? You might think, why not take benefit of your identity or your own mother tongue in international job market?

Well, it is not a benefit. On the contrary, it is a drawback.

You will see that if I list all the cases:

my upwork profile
  • Shanghai Advertising + Marketing Agency
  • Chinese speaking virtual assistant for real estate
  • research on the web & scheduling business appointment
  • Social Media maven native Chinese
  • Need someone to promote our site in China
  • Chinese Marketing for Online Japanese School
  • Need to register website in Chinese Search Engines and create fan-pages in Social Media
  • Information on the Chinese Short-Term Travel Study Market
    (for full descriptions check my profile:https://www.upwork.com/o/profiles/users/_~01c4e7353e8bdd6bc7)

There are two things in common. One is the they all have a word start with Capital c (Chinese). Another one is, if you read more carefully, that they mostly related to marketing. The two are not coincidence.

As I mentioned I have no formal working experiences on any type of jobs including marketing, then what title should I give myself on profile? One cannot skip this black when you fill your profile and this might be the first thing the employer will look at.

I figure out this quickly.I wrote my scrappy experiences, unapproved skills, and self-claimed talents on paper. And few options left for me and, to be exactly, the options are related to the languages(Chinese and English), and marketing.

The most profound combination is Chinese and marketing.

A marketer who speak Chinese, that sounds brilliant in the western market!The skill of Chinese looks like a very competitive strength, considering the amount of marketer who can speak Chinese on the network. And this combination kept provide me job offers.

However, something is out of balance.For past one and half years, I mainly reply on my language specialty and forgot to polish my other skill marketing. And the appropriate tile for me should not read as a Chinese marketer, but “Chinese who solves very basic marketing problems ”, or “you need her help due lack of English instructions”.

I was improved almost zero on marketing. All the things I dealt with are very very basic ones, like setting up accounts, doing simple translations, or making an reservation. I am not using the skill, but my mouth.If I want to be highly priced in global market, I have to compete with all the peers and. I have to stand out not simply due to my regional advantages, but also train myself to be good as other marketers. Which is another question, would they hire me if I am no Chinese? Could I solve those problems better than a marketer plus a translating machines?

I guess the good news is that I got hired simply because I am a Chinese. In another way to say it: I got rejected because I have no other strength to compete.

*** thanks for reading***

I Live in China, learn Esperanto, and write. need advice on marketing in China or languages learning? email me here velynne(at)outlook.com

velynne

Written by

velynne

Esperantist in China, struggler on writing, letstalkabout languages learning velynne(at)outlook(dot)com

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