Mentoring others has always been my passion. On my first year as a software developer, I mentored high school girls, in a program which was designed to make computer science and engineering related fields more accessible to girls. This program started because the numbers of girls who attended computer science and software engineering faculties were low (further reading in Hebrew— למה נשים לא לומדות מדעי המחשב). In this program I would go to different schools and talk to girls about computer science. …

This series portrays my experience as an R&D group leader of a group that has the same behavior as a failing startup. In my last two blog posts, I’ve presented a short background regarding the developers and the technologies. This blog post will deal with the vague definition of a group’s identity.

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In my last blog post, I portrayed an image almost too good to be true. An image of a productive software group, full of energy and hunger for projects. …

Imagine yourselves managing a software development group which consists of very strong programmers. They research and develop one of the most complicated systems known to mankind. They write and write and write code — but eventually, no one wants software versions of that code. No one knows what they actually do day to day. The truth is — no one believes in your group.

This year I became a software development group manager, and I’ve had to deal with 15 employees in 3 teams who, from the moment they arrive until the moment they leave the office — feel transparent.

This is part 2 of my series on my journey of healing a dying software group. In part 1- How Can Corporations Heal a Dying Software Group?, I presented an overall scan of a dying software group I had begun leading. This time, I will dive into the technological difficulties.

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My next step was to figure out how to overcome technological gaps. When I say technological gaps, I don’t mean switching from Java to Node.js, oh no. We’re talking here about obsolete systems, ancient coding language (worse than hieroglyphs, trust me on that one), an impossible coding environment, no coding…

Imagine yourselves managing a software development group which consists of very strong programmers. They research and develop one of the most complicated systems known to mankind. They write and write and write code — but eventually, no one wants software versions of that code. No one knows what they actually do day to day. The truth is — no one believes in your group.

This year I became a software development group manager, and I’ve had to deal with 15 employees in 3 teams who, from the moment they arrive until the moment they leave the office — feel transparent.

Victoriya Kalmanovich

A software engineering manager and an entrepreneur at heart ❤

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