No more ridiculous than the Democrats excuse that voter ID is racist, because black people can’t…
BPE
1

The day just wouldn’t be complete without someone like you barfing up the same tired strawmen and wingnut talking points.

First — the argument is not that a black person cannot afford to pay the fee to get a photo ID. In North Carolina, there is no fee to get a photo ID for the sole purpose of voting, as that would amount to a poll tax, which would be unconstitutional. There are other costs associated with getting a photo ID — such as having to take time off work (the DMV is only open on weekdays during hours when most people are working), having to find transportation to a DMV (in rural areas, these can be rather far away), or with having to get documents proving identity (such as a birth certificate). And these fees can affect anyone, not just African Americans. It’s just that here in North Carolina, a disproportionate number of African Americans are affected by this.

Second — welfare and public assistance organizations do not require photo ID. They have a rather lengthy list of forms of ID that are acceptable — forms that aren’t acceptable for voting. We’ll ignore your implication that most African Americans are on welfare, which isn’t true.

Third — you didn’t provide a source for your statistics, but I’m amused that you believe that the President is some sort of dictator who issues decrees regarding food stamps, unemployment, etc., and they are instantly obeyed. Many of the woes that you mention are more directly affected by Congress, and they are controlled by the Republicans.

Fourth — your argument of “you need an ID for everything these days” still does not address the fact that voter fraud by impersonation is so extremely rare as to be statistically invisible and doesn’t require a “solution” that effectively disenfranchises legitimate US citizens, as well as the fact that the ONLY purpose for photo ID laws is to keep African Americans and other groups perceived to vote mostly Democratic from voting — with “surgical precision”, as one court put it.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.