2 Keys for Successful Branding: Be brave. Hold steady.

Published on the Vigor restaurant and beverage branding blog

One of the biggest causes of brands missing the mark on innovation is loss of bravery from one or all parties involved. What usually starts as bold conviction early in a project wanes to a point of “different enough” by the time implementation rolls around. The fear of creating something that’s not going to work with a market. But where do these emotions derive?

There is an underlying need for certainty when crafting a new brand — be it a startup branding initiative or a rebranding effort. People want assurances that the new positioning, identity, and other elements will resonate, take hold, and grow successfully. Having this desire for a benchmark for what’s “right” results in emulating existing brands. It’s easy to say, “Hey, it’s working for Craft Brewery X, so we should do the same.”

Unfortunately this thinking is exemplary of fearful thinking and it results in “me too” brands, their products, identities, and all other facets. The world doesn’t need another Stone Brewing, and you’re not going to outdo a brand at its own game. No one can be a better Stone, than Stone themselves. It’s okay to respect and even admire the leaders in an industry, but finding your own stride and your own unique brand takes courage and bravery.

When you’re truly innovative, you won’t have the assurances of previous case studies or examples. The forest is dark, and scary. The only tools you have are sound strategies based on trend analysis, market insights, and foresight. You have to have a mix of gut and trust of knowledge. You have to build the case, believe in it, then eventually take a leap in the abyss knowing that you may be wrong. But if you’ve done the legwork, crafted the strategy, and built the brand’s components to bolster and build around that strategy, the leap shouldn’t be that scary.

Be brave, hold steady. That’s how brands like Stone Brewing, Chipotle, and other innovators rose about the crowd. They trusted their instincts and knowledge, while crowd was following the leader.