Jahan
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Looking back at three decades of Capcom’s seminal fighting franchise

Hadouken! It’s a word that all of us have heard at some point, a word which has since become synonymous with any fireball projectile attack, and one you’ll likely to hear it over and over any time you face Ryu in Street Fighter II.

The franchise may have officially started with the far less impactful 1987 debut, but it was in February 1991 when the series truly began with the release of Street Fighter II: The World Warrior. This game shaped not just the series’ identity for decades to come, but also forged the very format of 2D fighting games we know today. …


In conversation with Feral Cat Den, the developers behind Genesis Noir

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Creating a video game is almost analogous to creating a universe, but instead of atoms and other quantum particles, game developers have to make do with pixels, polygons, and a whole range of 0s and 1s. Game developers Evan Anthony and Jeremy Abel are from Feral Cat Den, and even as a small indie studio they couldn’t help but dream big. It wasn’t enough to just create a video game universe, instead in Genesis Noir they wanted to recreate and retell the universe itself. All by using the big bang power of noir-era jazz music.

Conceiving a video game with such cosmic ambitions is no easy feat, but like most imaginative ideas, it emerges out of the most simple and profound moments. Evan recalls the early stages of the game’s development, and how it all started with the literary inspiration received from a seminal science fiction author. …


Takeshi & Hiroshi is about brotherly love, reality’s many dragons, and designing the perfect RPG.

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Gaming and gamers can often attract many negative connotations and presumptions. Issues surrounding addiction, ill-advised content, and the exploitative nature of this now global juggernaut industry are not exaggerated. Still, even behind all the controversy, it’s worth remembering just what the core intent of this often-misunderstood hobby really was: to captivate a player’s imagination and make them feel larger than what they were.

Takeshi & Hiroshi is a timely release, originally on Apple Arcade before making its way to a much larger audience on Nintendo Switch. …


Escaped Chasm is a game about loneliness, escapism, and striking the balance between real life and fantasy.

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Escapism is a powerful and yet difficult thing to achieve. At age five, it was a skill nearly all of us could once summon with barely any effort at all. We could conjure up an imaginary friend, transform the living room into a lava pit, and go on an adventure without even leaving the bedroom. This becomes so much more difficult over time, as life takes its toll and weight of reality dawns on us further.

Videogames help here, because unlike most created and imaginary worlds, gaming allows us to, pragmatically speaking, physically touch a space via an avatar. It comes as no surprise that nowadays 30-somethings make up a larger section of the gaming populace. …


An interview with the rogue-like’s lead writer, Dene Carter, on the practice of writing and the gloomy reality in West of Dead.

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Even in a gaming landscape with no shortage of rogue-likes, West of Dead manages to stand out from the pack.

With a unique implementation of cover shooting in an RPG, wrapped in a metaphysically fascinating setting for players, West of Dead is easy for players to lose themselves in.

The creation of this philosophically-charged world and its existentially-driven protagonist were the brainchild of the game’s sole writer, Dene Carter. A 35-year industry veteran, West of Dead provided the tenured writer with a blank page. …


Games like Un Pas Fragile provide an effective medium to deliver timeless narratives in an interactive way.

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A long time ago the very idea of it would have been debatable, but nowadays the power of video games as a legitimate storytelling medium won’t get too many arguments.

Sure, as a form of entertainment built around gameplay mechanics with some even taking it to competitive heights, video games are indeed meant to be played and consumed much differently than other forms of entertainment. Regardless of the gameplay mechanic or genre, video games stand out from films, books, and music by not only encompassing aspects of each of these, but bringing the sum of parts together in a way that is authentically interactive. …


Definitely not another Yō-Kai Watch

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The term rogue-like, and its offshoot term rogue-lite, gets thrown around a lot these days. With so many games claiming the label, it’s not often we see a game truly encompassing the true meaning and implications of the term.

This unique genre has been prevalent, as of late, primarily in the ever-thriving independent video game scene, where developers choose to implement their neat ideas in a rogue-like design to provide players with near-endless replay value. …


A look at the enigmatic Gaijin Charenji, a creepypasta cartridge come to life.

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Developer overGame Studio might just be one individual, and their name might be Youenn Thirion, who may or may not be located somewhere in France. To be completely honest, I’m not sure, and I’m still not sure what to make of this studio’s first release on Xbox One titled Gaijen Charenji 1: Kiss or Kill.

The name alone is spooky and controversial, even before getting into the actual contents of the game itself. Described by its creator as a “Punk Narrative Shoot-Them Up”, this is an experience which is mind-bending within and beyond the game itself. My experience with it was an existential roller coaster that was as entertaining as it was terrifying. …


The story of LionWing Publishing and the search for unique but universal narratives.

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The greatest irony of falling in love with video games as a form of expression and art, is that sometimes the actual act of playing games gets in the way of anyone who wishes to pursue more in the video game industry.

When Bradly Halestorm started LionWing Publishing in 2017, it really all came about as a consequence of his own circumstances involving a serious repetitive strain injury, which completely took away his ability to hold a controller for more than a few uncomfortable minutes.

“I developed a repetitive stress injury at the time due to typing and game controllers. I was beyond repair, and I didn’t start playing games again until earlier this year. I couldn’t play games so I decided I was going to localize other people’s games.”

Among other factors which get in the way of pursuing a career in the video game industry, it was the addiction of playing games themselves which proved to be biggest, but once the injury set in and most games became out of reach, he finally had the time to pursue something which had been at the back of his mind since childhood. …

About

Jahan

Writing about video games for over a decade now, always looking for new creative challenges.

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