A guide to getting the right information from events by scraping the blockchain

Image for post
Image for post

Special thanks to Alchemy for reviewing the article, and to Richard Moore (Ricmoo) for reviewing some of the code. All images, including the cover image, were created and made ready for print by Linum Labs’ own Michal Shachman.

Introduction

As part of a recent project, Linum Labs was contracted to build an API which could be used to scrape relevant data from a suite of deployed contracts. While scraping event data is a fairly routine operation in blockchain applications, we found a lack of practical guides or even detailed explanations for how to use existing tooling. Are you looking to scrape…


Image for post
Image for post

Acknowledgements

When I first published this article in late May 2020, some early readers quickly pointed out some rather large errors that basically undermined the whole article. That sent me down a rabbit hole that got me in touch with numerous Eth2 client teams, led to me opening at least one GitHub issue and more. A bit more than a week later a large potion of the article has been revamped, and should work as intended. I wanted to take the time to thank MysticRyuujin and Butta.eth for their help, along with a big shoutout to the whole Lighthouse team. I…


Better than dual booting

Image for post
Image for post
The Xen panda

Warning: I am not, by any means, an expert on this subject. I am merely bullheaded and obstinate enough to have succeeded in getting a setup like this to work for myself.

This is a topic that involves really digging into the lower levels of your hard drive and has the potential to really ruin stuff.

I’m writing this since I couldn’t really find any reliable documentation on this, and I think it’s a great alternative to dual boot, and way better than the average VM setup. Proceed at your own risk!

Introduction

Let’s say you just got a shiny new…


Image for post
Image for post

We asked this question at EthCC, and here are some of our findings

The Cat Herders have been looking for ways to improve the Ethereum onboarding process since it was recommended as something we might look at. At EthCC Tim Beiko, Helena Flack, and myself moderated an open forum looking for ideas, pain points, experiences, and volunteers. We asked this question at EthCC, and here are some of our findings. There was some really good conversation around these topics, some of which I’d like to explore here.

You can see Tim’s totally awesome slides here.

The Onboarding Process

The First Thing They See: Perhaps there is a perception that ethereum.org is the first stop for those…


Two learning modalities

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Mariah Hewines on Unsplash

I sometimes write about being a self-taught dev. I believe there are a number of challenges that are more pronounced or even unique to self-taught coders. I couldn’t really find much material out there describing what I was experiencing, so I try to share what I can, and hope that it’s of use to someone out there.

Today is no exception. I think I may have finally put my finger on something that’s been on the edge of my mind for a while now. It’s a short read, but it was a realization that took me a long time.

Go Make a Project? Really?

I’ve…


It’s almost 2020 and you should be running your own Ethereum node

Image for post
Image for post

Special thanks to Gregoire Jeanmart for writing the tutorial that got me off the ground running my own node, and which inspired me to write this. Most of the guide on external SSDs was taken directly from his tutorial, with his permission. Thanks!

Node runners are one of many unsung heroes of Ethereum. Especially now that the requirements have been considerably lowered, it’s easier than ever to be a node runner. You can run your node in the background of your preferred machine, and not sacrifice functionality. …


Go build a project, they say

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Ilija Boshkov on Unsplash

In some ways this is the continuation of an article I published a while ago called Reflections of a Self-Taught Dev. It got some positive feedback and was even picked up by Better Programming (thanks!). You don’t need to read it at all to understand this, but if you’re wondering what got me to formulate these ideas (for some weird reason), check it out.

Why Don’t We Teach Practical Coding?

A recruiter called me a bit ago and asked me if I knew how to code Python. I said yes. She asked me if I had proven experience. I said that I was in the middle…


Mapping a journey of self-teaching programming

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Danial RiCaRoS on Unsplash

Background

I embarked on the journey of teaching myself to code about two years ago now. The motivation was simple: I was putting myself into school to pivot careers and needed something to support myself in the interim.

Programmer friends had been telling me for ages to try code, so I decided it was the most reasonable option. I didn’t have the time or money for boot camps or the like and my social circle assured me that self-teaching was a valid path, so I went for it.

I haven’t really met any others who did it quite as alone as…


Image for post
Image for post
Way Too Big Eth Diamond From Wikipedia Commons

V. Zamfir (Researcher, Ethereum Foundation) has addressed many important subjects in and about the Ethereum ecosystem. These are my personal thoughts about a couple of them: legality and value. I will attempt to summarize Zamfir’s positions to the best of my understanding, though no guarantee can be made as to how accurate my understanding of his opinions is. I’ll summarize my points at the end of each point.

How Legal Should Blockchain Frameworks Strive to Be?

Zamfir posits that blockchain platforms should strive to work with current regulations and regulators. A common goal of blockchain platforms is adoption, and adoption is hindered by illegality. Illegality is likely if…


Image for post
Image for post
https://xkcd.com/844/

Nearly two years ago I embarked on a journey to learn programming. I needed to pivot out of a career that was not meeting ends. Programmer friends of mine thought it was a great idea. Yay.

Nearly two years later I hate programming.

The first steps were easy enough. I got my hands on some books and some tutorials. I took one friend’s advice and started with Python, and the two most useful resources for me personally were Zed Shaw’s Learn Python the Hard Way (which you can find at learncodethehardway.com) and Code Combat (codecombat.com), though everyone is different. …

William Schwab

Blockchain Engineer

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store