With most people having an advanced computer in their pockets (and with the Apple Watch — attached to their wrist at all times) — we’re more in sync with our surroundings than ever. But when we go somewhere new — a festival, an event, a new venue — we’re suddenly put into a place we want to explore but don’t have the first idea on how to do it. Enter: the map.

We’ve all been there. You get somewhere and you get a big, flimsy, paper map. It has symbols, it has paths, and it’s another thing you get to keep track of and, OMG, they folded this thing like an origami swan and once it’s opened, it’s never the same. It gets wet and rips on one of the seams. When you open it up to find a bathroom, you get to look around like a disoriented wildebeest looking for something — anything — that matches one of these little symbols that’s printed right where..oh, where the seam ripped. Great. Look up to find the sun, it’s in the West — now I’m going to look for the compass rose on the map to give me a general idea of where the info station is so I can get a new map. Or I’ll just pick one of the many thrown on the ground with footprints on them.

Does this sound familiar? Is it just me?

We’re in the 21st Century. Why are we still relying on printed event maps when there’s a better way to get around already in our pocket (or on our wrist)? And why should I have to download an app just to look at something for a day, maybe two?

After a trip to the zoo, I was reminded about why Walkabout exists and the problem it’s solving. Saving paper (guys, enough with the paper already), an easy web interface where I don’t have to download an app or go to an app store, and a thing that measure my location in time and space. How novel!

Are you ready to ditch the map? Have any stories on getting lost? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter (or both).

Christine Adams is a copywriter, honorary Atlanta native, lover of ugly animals, introvert dynamo, and Frito pie enthusiast. Her work can be found on the internets without much trouble.